majuscule

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ma·jus·cule

 (mə-jŭs′kyo͞ol, măj′ə-skyo͞ol′)
n.
A large letter, either capital or uncial, used in writing or printing.

[French, from Latin māiusculus, somewhat larger, diminutive of māior, greater; see meg- in Indo-European roots.]

ma·jus′cule, ma·jus′cu·lar (mə-jŭs′kyə-lər) adj.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

majuscule

(ˈmædʒəˌskjuːl)
n
(Printing, Lithography & Bookbinding) a large letter, either capital or uncial, used in printing or writing
adj
(Printing, Lithography & Bookbinding) relating to, printed, or written in such letters. Compare minuscule
[C18: via French from Latin mājusculus, diminutive of mājor bigger, major]
majuscular adj
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

ma•jus•cule

(məˈdʒʌs kyul, ˈmædʒ əˌskyul)

adj.
1. written in capital letters or uncials (opposed to minuscule).
n.
2. a capital letter or uncial.
[1720–30; < Latin majuscula (littera) a somewhat bigger (letter)]
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.majuscule - one of the large alphabetic characters used as the first letter in writing or printing proper names and sometimes for emphasismajuscule - one of the large alphabetic characters used as the first letter in writing or printing proper names and sometimes for emphasis; "printers once kept the type for capitals and for small letters in separate cases; capitals were kept in the upper half of the type case and so became known as upper-case letters"
grapheme, graphic symbol, character - a written symbol that is used to represent speech; "the Greek alphabet has 24 characters"
small capital, small cap - a character having the form of an upper-case letter but the same height as lower-case letters
Adj.1.majuscule - of or relating to a style of writing characterized by somewhat rounded capital letters; 4th to 8th centuries
uppercase - relating to capital letters which were kept in the top half of a compositor's type case; "uppercase letters; X and Y and Z etc"
minuscular, minuscule - of or relating to a small cursive script developed from uncial; 7th to 9th centuries
2.majuscule - uppercase; "capital A"; "great A"; "many medieval manuscripts are in majuscule script"
uppercase - relating to capital letters which were kept in the top half of a compositor's type case; "uppercase letters; X and Y and Z etc"
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
Translations
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Son experience a ete debouchee par la suite sur la creation de sa propre maison dont les couvertures de ses livres sont reconnues par les trois lettres fameuses majuscules et points bleus sur fond blanc.
His main goal remains to survey some of the unresolved problems in the study of Greek and Coptic majuscules. He covers the scripts of the Nag Hammadi codices, the scripts of the Bodmer Papyri, Greek biblical majuscule, Coptic biblical majuscule, sloping pointed majuscule, liturgical majuscule, and decorated liturgical majuscule.
On a ainsi ecarte de la reception a peu pres tout de ce qui faisait la richesse et la complexite du document initial, sauf en quelque sorte le bandeau rouge qui servait d'annonce publicitaire et sur lequel etait ecrit en lettres majuscules le simple mot << manifeste >>.
Les signes de ponctuations ou la mise en majuscules ne sont pas non plus corriges.
Characters in old manuscripts are of capital letter size and called majuscules. The opposite term is miniscules.
Eriksen elucidates how textual and rhetorical features alongside the use of initials, majuscules, and punctuation may indicate vocal performance.
Ullman argues that the interest in inscriptional majuscules had appeared already in the writing of the "inventor" of humanist script, Poggio Bracciolini, between 1403 and 1408.
La locutrice utilise l'imperatif, les majuscules, l'exclamation pour soutenir ses idees et pour marquer son discours polemique.
La cerise sur le gateau, presque ostentatoire, invite ce [beaucoup moins que]petit Poucet[beaucoup plus grand que] a afficher l'envie devoratrice dans une [beaucoup moins que]tenue[beaucoup plus grand que] de pretendant, quand bien meme l'adversaire evolue en championnat professionnel de l'elite et s'ecrit en majuscules, le CS Constantine.