malapropism

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mal·a·prop·ism

 (măl′ə-prŏp-ĭz′əm)
n.
1. Ludicrous misuse of a word, especially by confusion with one of similar sound.
2. An example of such misuse.

[From malaprop.]

mal′a·prop′i·an (-prŏp′ē-ən) adj.

malapropism

(ˈmæləprɒpˌɪzəm)
n
1. (Literary & Literary Critical Terms) the unintentional misuse of a word by confusion with one of similar sound, esp when creating a ridiculous effect, as in I am not under the affluence of alcohol
2. (Literary & Literary Critical Terms) the habit of misusing words in this manner
[C18: after Mrs Malaprop in Sheridan's play The Rivals (1775), a character who misused words, from malapropos]
ˈmalaprop, ˌmalaˈpropian adj

mal•a•prop•ism

(ˈmæl ə prɒpˌɪz əm)

n.
1. a confused use of words in which an appropriate word is replaced by one with similar sound but ludicrously inappropriate meaning.
2. an instance of this, as in “Lead the way and we'll precede.”
[1840–50; after Mrs. Malaprop, a character in Sheridan's The Rivals (1775)]

malapropism

1. the unconscious use of an inappropriate word, especially in a cliché, as fender for feather in “You could have knocked me over with a fender.” [Named after Mrs. Malaprop, a character prone to such uses, in The Rivals, by Richard Brinsley Sheridan]
2. an instance of such misuse. Cf. heterophemism.
See also: Language

malapropism

Unintentional use of a wrong word for one that it sounds like.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.malapropism - the unintentional misuse of a word by confusion with one that sounds similarmalapropism - the unintentional misuse of a word by confusion with one that sounds similar
misstatement - a statement that contains a mistake
Translations
perronisme

malapropism

[ˈmæləprɒpɪzəm] Nlapsus m inv linguae, equivocación f de palabras

malapropism

nMalapropismus m
References in periodicals archive ?
Comedy malapropisms - characters confusing Terry Dean with James Parallels could be drawn between their lot and that of their characters in Byrne's play, aching for a step up from their first-rung jobs mixing paint in carpet factory.
How the property's ghosts must shudder as dropped aitches and malapropisms crash to glass floors.
So you will warm to his eccentricities and laugh out loud at his malapropisms - or simply dismiss all the cock-ups, confusion, slapstick and neverending misunderstandings and memory losses as tedious, tiresome and painfully unfunny.
He's a poet-critic, folding his philosophy into triumphant malapropisms.
It is littered with grammatical errors, spelling mistakes, inappropriate capitalisation and malapropisms, including a reference to Mr Mitchell's "digesting behaviour".
Katherine gained near-celebrity status for her malapropisms ala Yogi Berra.
Many of the laughs originate from malapropisms and Butterfly's haphazard English, but her writing also provides a social commentary on the problems facing the country, which are exaggerated by Butterfly's often nave and scathing, view of the world.
GLM also predicted "Palinism," a reference to conservative politician Sarah Palin s malapropisms such as "refudiate", which combines refute and repudiate, would be a top word for 2011.
Every week a swathe of non sequiturs, inadvertent malapropisms and mixed metaphors are spouted by football pundits.
The bodies pile up thick and fast as Inspector Pratt (Norman Pace) carries out his investigation, armed only with a copious supply of malapropisms ("the thick plottens") and a shabby raincoat that not even Columbo would wear.
Those who feared wrong names and comic malapropisms had become extinct at Lord's since former chairman of selectors Ted Dexter left office need not have worried.
The Count is actually comedian Steve Delaney, who created the elderly pompous, mostly-out-of-work, deluded thespian from Yorkshire who appears to suffer from attention deficit disorder and memory loss, and apt to use malapropisms in his attempts to sound educated.