malaria

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ma·lar·i·a

 (mə-lâr′ē-ə)
n.
1. An infectious disease characterized by cycles of chills, fever, and sweating, caused by a protozoan of the genus Plasmodium in red blood cells, which is transmitted to humans by the bite of an infected female anopheles mosquito.
2. Archaic Bad or foul air; miasma.

[Italian, from mala aria, bad air (from the belief that malaria was caused by vapors emanating from swamps, rather than mosquitos that bred there ) : mala, feminine of malo, bad (from Latin malus; see mel- in Indo-European roots) + aria, air; see aria.]

ma·lar′i·al, ma·lar′i·an, ma·lar′i·ous adj.

malaria

(məˈlɛərɪə)
n
(Pathology) an infectious disease characterized by recurring attacks of chills and fever, caused by the bite of an anopheles mosquito infected with any of four protozoans of the genus Plasmodium (P. vivax, P. falciparum, P. malariae, or P. ovale)
[C18: from Italian mala aria bad air, from the belief that the disease was caused by the unwholesome air in swampy districts]
maˈlarial, maˈlarian, maˈlarious adj

ma•lar•i•a

(məˈlɛər i ə)

n.
1. any of a group of usu. intermittent or remittent diseases characterized by attacks of chills, fever, and sweating and caused by a parasitic protozoan transferred to the human bloodstream by an anopheles mosquito.
2. Archaic. unwholesome or poisonous air.
[1730–40; < Italian, contraction of mala aria bad air]
ma•lar′i•al, ma•lar′i•an, ma•lar′i•ous, adj.

ma·lar·i·a

(mə-lâr′ē-ə)
An infectious disease of tropical areas that is caused by a parasite transmitted by mosquitoes. It causes repeated attacks of chills, fever, and sweating.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.malaria - an infective disease caused by sporozoan parasites that are transmitted through the bite of an infected Anopheles mosquitomalaria - an infective disease caused by sporozoan parasites that are transmitted through the bite of an infected Anopheles mosquito; marked by paroxysms of chills and fever
blackwater fever - severe and often fatal malaria characterized by kidney damage resulting in dark urine
jungle fever - severe form of malaria occurring in tropical regions
protozoal infection - any infection caused by a protozoan
chills and fever, ague - successive stages of chills and fever that is a symptom of malaria
Translations
malárie
malaria
malaria
מלריה
malarija
malária
malaria
mÿrakalda, malaría
マラリア
말라리아
maliarija
malārija
malária
malarija
malaria
ไข้มาลาเรีย
bệnh sốt rét

malaria

[məˈlɛərɪə]
A. Nmalaria f, paludismo m
B. CPD malaria control Nlucha f contra la malaria

malaria

[məˈlɛəriə] nmalaria f, paludisme m

malaria

nMalaria f

malaria

[məˈlɛərɪə] nmalaria

malaria

(məˈleəriə) noun
a fever caused by the bite of a certain type of mosquito.

malaria

مَلَارْيَا malárie malaria Malaria ελονοσία malaria, paludismo malaria paludisme malarija malaria マラリア 말라리아 malaria malaria malaria malária малярия malaria ไข้มาลาเรีย sıtma bệnh sốt rét 疟疾

malaria

n malaria, paludismo
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In a study with mice, published in Cell Reports, researchers tested the effects of malaria infection on the immune system.
It is believed that people travelling to Western Africa are at the highest risk of malaria; estimating that 300 in every 100,000 travelers to the countries of this region had malaria infection, whereas in Southern Africa this risk affects only 46 travelers out of 100,000.
Malaria infection is caused by a parasite that is transmitted through the bite of the female Anopheles mosquito.