plasmodium

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plas·mo·di·um

 (plăz-mō′dē-əm)
n. pl. plas·mo·di·a (-dē-ə)
1. A multinucleate, often large mass of protoplasm that moves and ingests food and is characteristic of the vegetative phase of plasmodial slime molds.
2. Any of various protozoans of the genus Plasmodium, which includes the parasites that cause malaria.

[New Latin Plasmōdium, genus name : plasm(o)- + Greek -ōdēs, resembling; see collodion.]

plas·mo′di·al (-dē-əl) adj.

plasmodium

(plæzˈməʊdɪəm)
n, pl -dia (-dɪə)
1. (Biology) an amoeboid mass of protoplasm, containing many nuclei: a stage in the life cycle of certain organisms, esp the nonreproductive stage of the slime moulds
2. (Animals) any parasitic sporozoan protozoan of the genus Plasmodium, such as P. falciparum and P. vivax, which cause malaria
[C19: New Latin; see plasma, -ode1]
plasˈmodial adj

plas•mo•di•um

(plæzˈmoʊ di əm)

n., pl. -di•a (-di ə)
1. an ameboid, multinucleate mass or sheet of cytoplasm characteristic of some stages of organisms, as of slime molds.
2. any parasitic protozoan of the genus Plasmodium, causing malaria in humans.
[1870–75; < New Latin; see plasma, -ode1, -ium2]
plas•mo′di•al, adj.

plas·mo·di·um

(plăz-mō′dē-əm)
Plural plasmodia
1. A mass of protoplasm having many cell nuclei but not divided into separate cells. It is formed by the combination of many amoeba-like cells and is characteristic of the active, feeding phase of certain slime molds.
2. Any of various single-celled organisms (called protozoans) that exist as parasites in vertebrate animals, one of which causes malaria.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.plasmodium - multinucleate sheet of cytoplasm characteristic of some stages of such organisms as slime moldsplasmodium - multinucleate sheet of cytoplasm characteristic of some stages of such organisms as slime molds
cytol, cytoplasm - the protoplasm of a cell excluding the nucleus; is full of proteins that control cell metabolism
2.plasmodium - parasitic protozoan of the genus Plasmodium that causes malaria in humansplasmodium - parasitic protozoan of the genus Plasmodium that causes malaria in humans
sporozoan - parasitic spore-forming protozoan
genus Plasmodium - type genus of the family Plasmodiidae
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However, simian malaria parasites can infect humans (1); for example, P.
Army SBIR (Small Business Innovation Research) Phase II Quality Award for its development of VecTest(TM), a rapid assay for detecting malaria parasites in infected mosquitoes.
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Until recently, scientists were convinced that malaria parasites were so adept at taking over liver cells that any attempt by the liver cell to attack the parasite would be futile, However researchers at Seattle BioMed are using systems biology to begin to unravel part of this mystery, with the finding that liver cells infected with malaria parasites are more vulnerable than previously thought, and that existing drugs can be leveraged to force those infected cells to self destruct while leaving the healthy cells intact.
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No malaria parasites were observed on blood smear at admission.
Alan Cowman by Glaxo Wellcome Chairman Sir Richard Sykes, in recognition of his work in developing an "understanding of the interaction of malaria parasites with the human host.
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The treatment reduced by about 95 percent the number of malaria parasites that passed through the wall, the team reports online and in an upcoming Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.