plasmodium

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Related to Malaria parasites: Plasmodium falciparum, Malaria vaccine, Malarial parasite

plas·mo·di·um

 (plăz-mō′dē-əm)
n. pl. plas·mo·di·a (-dē-ə)
1. A multinucleate, often large mass of protoplasm that moves and ingests food and is characteristic of the vegetative phase of plasmodial slime molds.
2. Any of various protozoans of the genus Plasmodium, which includes the parasites that cause malaria.

[New Latin Plasmōdium, genus name : plasm(o)- + Greek -ōdēs, resembling; see collodion.]

plas·mo′di·al (-dē-əl) adj.

plasmodium

(plæzˈməʊdɪəm)
n, pl -dia (-dɪə)
1. (Biology) an amoeboid mass of protoplasm, containing many nuclei: a stage in the life cycle of certain organisms, esp the nonreproductive stage of the slime moulds
2. (Animals) any parasitic sporozoan protozoan of the genus Plasmodium, such as P. falciparum and P. vivax, which cause malaria
[C19: New Latin; see plasma, -ode1]
plasˈmodial adj

plas•mo•di•um

(plæzˈmoʊ di əm)

n., pl. -di•a (-di ə)
1. an ameboid, multinucleate mass or sheet of cytoplasm characteristic of some stages of organisms, as of slime molds.
2. any parasitic protozoan of the genus Plasmodium, causing malaria in humans.
[1870–75; < New Latin; see plasma, -ode1, -ium2]
plas•mo′di•al, adj.

plas·mo·di·um

(plăz-mō′dē-əm)
Plural plasmodia
1. A mass of protoplasm having many cell nuclei but not divided into separate cells. It is formed by the combination of many amoeba-like cells and is characteristic of the active, feeding phase of certain slime molds.
2. Any of various single-celled organisms (called protozoans) that exist as parasites in vertebrate animals, one of which causes malaria.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.plasmodium - multinucleate sheet of cytoplasm characteristic of some stages of such organisms as slime moldsplasmodium - multinucleate sheet of cytoplasm characteristic of some stages of such organisms as slime molds
cytol, cytoplasm - the protoplasm of a cell excluding the nucleus; is full of proteins that control cell metabolism
2.plasmodium - parasitic protozoan of the genus Plasmodium that causes malaria in humansplasmodium - parasitic protozoan of the genus Plasmodium that causes malaria in humans
sporozoan - parasitic spore-forming protozoan
genus Plasmodium - type genus of the family Plasmodiidae
References in periodicals archive ?
Indeed, biting and ingesting blood from children infected with malaria, which contained a combination of antibiotics known not to directly affect the malaria parasites, made the mosquitoes more prone to infection by the parasites.
Genetically disabling one of those pore-forming proteins, called PPLP2, allows the malaria parasites to break free of the vacuole but keeps them firmly sealed inside the red blood cell, Glushakova and colleagues discovered.
In a mouse model of malaria, a single dose of (+)-SJ733 killed 80 percent of malaria parasites within 24 hours.
Children with the fewest number of these cells were more likely to be infected and to harbor malaria parasites, but the scientists determined that they also were less likely to suffer from clinical symptoms, such as fevers.
TEHRAN (FNA)- Researchers have used an anti-tank Javelin missile detector, more commonly used in warfare to detect the enemy, in a new test to rapidly identify malaria parasites in blood.
Washington, May 22 ( ANI ): Scientists have identified a substance, or antigen, that generates antibodies that can hinder the ability of malaria parasites to multiply, which may protect against severe malaria infection.
When a mosquito bites an infected person, a small amount of blood is taken which contains microscopic malaria parasites.
Researchers have tested a handful of molecules that block NMT in malaria parasites living in human red blood cells and in mice.
Their topics include the Apicomplexan genomic landscape: the evolutionary context of Plasmodium, Plasmodium genomics and the art of sequencing malaria parasite genomes, Plasmodium experimental genetic crosses, the invasion of host red blood cells by malaria parasites, host cell remodeling and protein trafficking, and the malariologist's molecular toolbox.
Although some sources translate Anopheles as "harmful," it would be decades before Ronald Ross showed in 1897 that these mosquitoes transmit malaria parasites, and Meigen was most likely using Anopheles in a more literal interpretation as "useless.
Once it took up residence in the mosquitoes, the modified bacteria inhibited up to 98 percent of human and rodent malaria parasites from developing.
Now, investigators from the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (NIAID), part of the National Institutes of Health, have found the genes that malaria parasites use to create these feeding pores.