pityrosporum

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pityrosporum

(ˌpɪtɪrəʊˈspɔːrəm)
n
(Medicine) med a genus of fungi that live on the skin, esp that of the scalp and face, present in conditions such as dandruff and dermatitis
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References in periodicals archive ?
Dandruff is caused by a fungus called 'Malassezia globosa'.
Malassezia restricta yeasts found in oily skin and scalp follicles are linked to several skin conditions.
Symbiotic with bacteria on the skin are yeasts, such as Malassezia, and parasites, such as Demodex.
The scalp is also the niche for the fungus Malassezia furfur and the bacterium Staphylococcus.
Pityriasis versicolor (PV) is a chronic, superficial cutaneous fungal infection caused by fungus Malassezia (M).
Pityriasis versicolor (PV) is a superficial fungal infection of skin, caused by genus Malassezia.1 M.
Yeast infections, such as Malassezia, and bacteria, especially Staphyloccocus, make dogs smell like, well, wet dogs.
It is a superficial fungal infection caused by Malassezia spp, which is a dimorphic fungus, which is a member of normal flora of skin, [8] Clinically, it is characterised by numerous fine scaly, dyspigmented irregular macules most often occurring on the trunk, chest and proximal part of upper limbs.
A yeast-like fungus known as malassezia lives on the scalps of many adults, and when it is overproduced, can cause more skin cells to grow, resulting in dandruff.
It is probably due to the over-growth of the yeast malassezia furfur and abnormalities of skin surface lipids.2,4
Seborrheic dermatitis is closely linked with Malassezia, a fungus that normally lives on the scalp and feeds on the oils that the hair follicles secrete.
Atopy and Malassezia perianal dermatitis are two biggies.