Malay Archipelago


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Malay Archipelago

An island group of southeast Asia between Australia and the Asian mainland and separating the Indian and Pacific Oceans. It includes Indonesia, the Philippines, Borneo, and East Timor.

Malay Archipelago

n
(Placename) a group of islands in the Indian and Pacific Oceans, between SE Asia and Australia: the largest group of islands in the world; includes over 3000 Indonesian islands, about 7000 islands of the Philippines, and, sometimes, New Guinea

Ma′lay Archipel′ago


n.
an extensive island group in the Indian and Pacific oceans, SE of Asia, including the Sunda Islands, the Moluccas, and the Philippines. Also called Malaysia.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.Malay Archipelago - a group of islands in the Indian and Pacific Oceans between Asia and AustraliaMalay Archipelago - a group of islands in the Indian and Pacific Oceans between Asia and Australia
curry - (East Indian cookery) a pungent dish of vegetables or meats flavored with curry powder and usually eaten with rice
Sunda Islands - a chain of islands in the western Malay Archipelago
Borneo, Kalimantan - 3rd largest island in the world; in the western Pacific to the north of Java; largely covered by dense jungle and rain forest; part of the Malay Archipelago
Pacific, Pacific Ocean - the largest ocean in the world
East Indian - a native or inhabitant of the East Indies
Malay, Malayan - a member of a people inhabiting the northern Malay Peninsula and Malaysia and parts of the western Malay Archipelago
References in classic literature ?
My next effort in short-story writing was a departure--I mean a departure from the Malay Archipelago. Without premeditation, without sorrow, without rejoicing, and almost without noticing it, I stepped into the very different atmosphere of "An Outpost of Progress." I found there a different moral attitude.
"As soon as I've got through my hospital appointments I shall get a ship; I want to go to the East--the Malay Archipelago, Siam, China, and all that sort of thing--and then I shall take odd jobs.
Wallace, who is now studying the natural history of the Malay archipelago, has arrived at almost exactly the same general conclusions that I have on the origin of species.
But does not Alfred Wallace relate in his famous book on the Malay Archipelago how, amongst the Aru Islanders, he discovered in an old and naked savage with a sooty skin a peculiar resemblance to a dear friend at home?
I remember particularly the lascars who came from south-east Asia, including the Malay Archipelago and Singapore.
Aboriginal Australians are thought to have first arrived on the mainland by boat from the Malay Archipelago between 40,000 and 60,000 years ago.
In The forgotten queens of Islam Fatima Mernissi (1993) mentioned that the Islamic societies in the Malay Archipelago have been special, in regard to the reign of women.
Meanwhile Darwin, happily removed from stink of London, received the shock of his life when a letter arrived from Alfred Russell Wallace outlining the principles of evolution, which Wallace had theorized during a birding trip to the Malay Archipelago. Goaded into action, and despite feeling intense grief over the death of his youngest child from scarlet fever, Darwin began the frenzied writing of his masterpiece, On the Origin of Species, which would appear the following year.
"The Singapore Government felt that if we were to identify a point of origin as China, India or the Malay Archipelago, because we came from these regions, it would prove to be a very divisive kind of history because people would identify themselves by their origin," he says, adding that Raffles and 1819 were seen as a neutral starting point.
In his journal of his travels around here, published in 1869 as The Malay Archipelago, he also notes that "the aborigines of Banda were Papuans, and a portion of them still exist on the Ke Islands, where they emigrated when the Portuguese first took possession of their native island."
This well-known Chinese Muslim official from Yunnan led several expeditions to the Malay Archipelago, including Melaka, in the fifteenth century (Tan 1991, p.