Malay States


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Malay States

pl n
1. (Historical Terms) the former states of the Malay Peninsula that, together with Penang and Malacca, formed the Union of Malaya (1946) and the Federation of Malaya (1948). Perak, Selangor, Negri Sembilan, and Pahang were established as the Federated Malay States by the British in 1895 and Perlis, Kedah, Kelantan, and Trengannu as the Unfederated Malay States in 1909 (joined by Johore in 1914)
2. (Placename) the former states of the Malay Peninsula that, together with Penang and Malacca, formed the Union of Malaya (1946) and the Federation of Malaya (1948). Perak, Selangor, Negri Sembilan, and Pahang were established as the Federated Malay States by the British in 1895 and Perlis, Kedah, Kelantan, and Trengannu as the Unfederated Malay States in 1909 (joined by Johore in 1914)
References in periodicals archive ?
He said these are July 22, 1963 when for the first time Sarawak was led by a local in attaining self-determination and August 31, 1963 when Sarawak joined the Federated Malay States to celebrate this date as National Day.
The island was either a separate crown colony or a part of the Straits Settlements, which included Penang and Malacca, but not the other Malay states. Over nearly 150 years, our political values, our inter-communal relations, and our worldviews had diverged from the society on the other side of the Causeway.
Others address Moors, international law, and the origin of the colonial matrix; the first attempts of Spanish jurists to recover the medieval legal and religious tradition to construct the relationships between the "civilized" European system and the "uncivilized" world of Indies, focusing on the text to known as Requerimento; land rights and 19th-century Ottoman states succession treaties and the Islamic origin of Ottoman land regulation; how international law informs the sovereign status of the polities for Malaysia and how this status evolved through the formation of the Malay States; the Islamic Law of War; and the origins and evolution of Islamic law approaches to rebellion and its significance to the current international humanitarian law discourse.
The report on the 1931 census for the Straits Settlements, the Federated and Unfederated Malay States and Brunei, which is the census taken closest to the creation of "The Man from Greece", is noteworthy as vivid testimony to the "classifying mind of the colonial state" (Anderson 1991, p.
An example near us is Malaysia, which was federated in 1963 out of largely Malay states - including Sabah, a British territory in North Borneo, despite its only being leased from the Philippines.
(16) Frank Swettenham, Resident-General of the Federated Malay States (1896-1901) and Governor of the Straits Settlements (1901-04), wanted to open up British Malaya by constructing 'high-class roads, railways, telegraphs, waterworks'.
Mok describes the organizational changes in the island-based surveying establishment, and the important surveys and maps they undertook, from Raffles' 1819 founding of an East India Company trading post on the island, through the first 1:63,360 map of the entire island in 1852, the merger of the Survey Departments of the Straits Settlements and the Federated Malay States in 1920, the extension of the primary triangulation of Malaya to Singapore in 1921, the first modern contoured topographical map of the island in 1924, Japanese-occupation mapping 1942-1945, a 1:10,000 topographic series in 1959, formation of the Singapore Armed Forces Mapping Unit (SAFMU) in 1970, to metrication in the 1970s, computerisation in the 1980s, and the creation of a national digital terrain model in 2013.
Nathan was one of the many aboard HMS Malaya during the battle, a ship named in honour of the Federated Malay States in British Malaya, whose government paid for her construction.
The broad geographical unit defined by the families' economic interests included Burma, Siam, the western Malay states and Sumatra, while marital, business and associational alliances connected the families to other Chinese dialect and locality groups, as well as the region's Malay, Indian, Arab, Siamese and other ethnic communities.
Healey suggested that the epidemic levels of long-distance raiding and headhunting which emerged in northwest Borneo during the late eighteenth century was a function of profound contradictions in relations between coastal Malay states and the tribesmen they sought to dominate.
The presence of large numbers of Chinese and Indians is due to the colonial policy during the 19th century, when the British needed labour for economic exploitation of the Malay states. There was massive immigration of the Chinese and Indians during this period.
But the city was repopulated and rebuilt (this time in brick, by order of the British, to avoid future destruction) and grew rapidly in wealth and prominence, becoming in turn the capital of Selangor state, the Federated Malay States, independent Malaya and, finally, modern Malaysia.