Malay

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Ma·lay

 (mə-lā′, mā′lā′)
n.
1. A member of a people inhabiting the Malay Peninsula and parts of the western Malay Archipelago.
2. The Austronesian language of the Malays. Also called Bahasa Melayu.
adj.
1. Of, relating to, or characteristic of the Malays or their language.
2. Of or relating to Malaysia, the Malay Peninsula, or the Malay Archipelago.

[Obsolete Dutch Malayo, from Malay Melayu.]

Ma·lay′an (mə-lā′ən) adj. & n.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

Malay

(məˈleɪ)
n
1. (Peoples) a member of a people living chiefly in Malaysia and Indonesia who are descendants of Mongoloid immigrants
2. (Languages) the language of this people, belonging to the Malayo-Polynesian family
adj
3. (Peoples) of or relating to the Malays or their language
4. (Languages) of or relating to the Malays or their language
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

Ma•lay

(ˈmeɪ leɪ, məˈleɪ)
n.
1. a member of a people of Southeast Asia comprising the principal inhabitants of the Malay Peninsula, adjacent parts of E Sumatra, and the intervening islands and living in many coastal settlements on Borneo, Sumatra, and other islands of the Indonesian archipelago.
2. the Austronesian language of the Malays.
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.Malay - a member of a people inhabiting the northern Malay Peninsula and Malaysia and parts of the western Malay ArchipelagoMalay - a member of a people inhabiting the northern Malay Peninsula and Malaysia and parts of the western Malay Archipelago
East India, East Indies, Malay Archipelago - a group of islands in the Indian and Pacific Oceans between Asia and Australia
Malaya, Malaysia - a constitutional monarchy in southeastern Asia on Borneo and the Malay Peninsula; achieved independence from the United Kingdom in 1957
Malay Peninsula - a peninsula in southeastern Asia occupied by parts of Malaysia and Thailand and Myanmar
Asian, Asiatic - a native or inhabitant of Asia
2.Malay - a western subfamily of Western Malayo-Polynesian languages
Western Malayo-Polynesian - a western subfamily of Malayo-Polynesian languages
Bahasa Kebangsaan, Bahasa Malaysia, Bahasa Melayu, Malaysian - the Malay language spoken in Malaysia
Bahasa, Bahasa Indonesia, Indonesian - the dialect of Malay used as the national language of the Republic of Indonesia or of Malaysia
Adj.1.Malay - of or relating to or characteristic of the people or language of Malaysia and the northern Malay Peninsula and parts of the western Malay ArchipelagoMalay - of or relating to or characteristic of the people or language of Malaysia and the northern Malay Peninsula and parts of the western Malay Archipelago; "Malay peoples"; "Malayan syllable structure"
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
Translations
Malajecmalajskýmalajština
Malaja
malaiji
maláj
bahasa Melayu
マレー語
malayisk
malajski
Malajecmalajskýmalajština
malajiska
tiếng Mã laitiếng Mã-lai

Malay

[məˈleɪ]
A. ADJmalayo
B. N
1. (= person) → malayo/a m/f
2. (Ling) → malayo m
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005

Malay

[məˈleɪ]
adjmalais(e)
n
(= person) → Malais(e) m/f
(= language) → malais m
Collins English/French Electronic Resource. © HarperCollins Publishers 2005

Malay

adjmalaiisch; the Malay Archipelagoder Malaiische Archipel; the Malay Peninsuladie Malaiische Halbinsel, die Halbinsel Malakka
n
Malaie m, → Malaiin f
(Ling) → Malaiisch nt
Collins German Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged 7th Edition 2005. © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1980 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1997, 1999, 2004, 2005, 2007

Malay

[məˈleɪ]
1. adjmalese
2. n (person) → malese m/f; (language) → malese m
Collins Italian Dictionary 1st Edition © HarperCollins Publishers 1995
References in periodicals archive ?
'I am just wondering how is khat going to assist the Bahasa Malayu syllabus in the primary schools if khat might not be fully integrated with the subject matter,' he asked.
'Bago pa yan hinanap nmin ang meeting place tapos nagdistribute pinaglakad pa ng malayu, kawawa mga Sr Citizen na ksama namin, tapos pagdating dun pwede nmn pla dumiritsu dun,' she said.
Indeed, based on data gathered in 1939, Schneeberger noted that Tidung "proudly call[ed] themselves Orang Malayu" (Schneeberger 1979:17).
The intriguing ramwong phloen, ramwong sawing and ramwong malayu (Malay circle dance) style combinations date from the Middle Period.
The average shaman does not make these distinctions and may even consider bayu as a Sakai Malay (local Sakai Malayu) dikei style.
There are many in Malaysia who speak many different languages (Hakka, Hokkien, Cantonese, Mandarin, Tamil, Hindi, Bahasa Malayu, and many others).
Probably due to the Philippines' proximity to Malaysia and Indonesia, the language of these countries, Bahasa Indonesia and Bahasa Malayu, are very similar to the Filipino dialect.
Allowing these border provinces to elect their own governors might be in the picture." (47) Yet Thailand has for years equivocated on even making Malayu an official language in the deep south for fear that it would fuel separatism.
Most Muslims in the deep south are fiercely proud of their culture, Malayu language and religion, which distinguishes them from the rest of predominantly Buddhist Thailand.
In the introduction, the author provides useful background information on ethnicity, the Malayu (Malays), the Straits of Melaka, and trade in the region.
Tuan Guru--the first official imam at the Cape--used Malayu as the medium of instruction in the Dorp Street madrasah (Muslim religious school) which he established at the end of the 18th century.