Malcolm

(redirected from Malcolm Canmore)

Malcolm

(ˈmælkəm)
n
(Biography) George. 1917–97, British harpsichordist
References in periodicals archive ?
Describing the Scots as a "mongrel race", he traced the origins of the modern nation as a mix of Viking blood, Celts and Irish with a touch of ancient explorers from Rome before Malcolm Canmore, and later William Wallace and Robert the Bruce, carved out independence from the English yoke.
Enter now the character of Malcolm Canmore, from a line of men desperate to get their hands on the Scots throne, as they were not part of the main royal clan.
Historians say there have been Gatherings of one sort or another at Braemar since the days of King Malcolm Canmore, nine hundred years ago.
BANNER'S HISTORY THE banner of St Cuthbert Saint was first mentioned when it was taken into Scotland to restore Edgar, son of Malcolm Canmore the Scottish king, who had been present at the laying of the foundation stone of Durham Cathedral.
THE FIRST OF THE THREE SCOTTISH KINGS named Alexander was one of the many sons of Malcolm Canmore, Macbeth's killer, and his second wife, the saintly Queen Margaret.
In the classic way, it was in the interest of bards under the patronage of a rival Scottish royal line, deriving from the nobleman Malcolm Canmore, to reinvent history.
It is believed that King Malcolm Canmore and his army camped here before going on to defeat McBeth in battle near Lumphanon in 1057.
THE king who succeeded Macbeth in 1057 was Lulach the Fool, but he only sat on the Scottish throne for a few months before being killed, when Malcolm Canmore took the crown (Page 40, September 1).
Winning the heart of King Malcolm Canmore, she became queen and initiated the observance of Christ Mass during the Yule celebration.
Its explanation would run something along these lines: when Lulach, Macbeth's stepson, was killed by Malcolm Canmore in 1058, the royal line of Moray did not die out but was represented by Lulach's son, Mael Snechta.
Malcolm Canmore (1005-1034) established a royal palace there.
In 1091, Malcolm Canmore or Ceann Mor, otherwise Malcolm III, invaded the North-East, rampaging through Northumberland.