malware

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mal·ware

 (măl′wâr′)
n.
Malicious computer software that interferes with normal computer functions or sends personal data about the user to unauthorized parties over the internet.

malware

(ˈmælwɛə)
n
(Computer Science) a computer program designed specifically to damage or disrupt a system, such as a virus
[C20: from mal(icious) + (soft)ware]

malware

Software that is intended to damage computer systems.
Translations

malware

[ˈmælwɛər] n (COMPUTING)malware m, logiciel m néfaste
References in periodicals archive ?
Recent versions of the app included a new advertising library that contained malicious code that delivered malware to Android devices, according to Russian-based antivirus tech giant Kaspersky, cited by ZDNet.
Malicious code is classified into executable and non-executable code.
Last week, the court had granted an interim bail before arrest to the journalist in a case registered by the Federal Investigation Agency (FIA) under Sections 10(a) (cyber terrorism), 11 (electronic forgery) and 20 (malicious code) of the Pakistan Electronic Crime Act, 2016.
He also addressed the false information of the alleged 'logic bomb' or malicious code embedded in the source code of their automated election system for the 2019 elections.
They are a popular target for cybercriminals looking to distribute malicious code, not least because users in search of illegal content often disconnect their online security solutions or ignore system notifications in order to install the downloaded content.
These malware infections don't execute their malicious code until they're outside of the controlled environment.
"Based on the analysis of malicious code, ESET's researchers have already identified the banks targeted by the attackers and have informed their representatives.
Toronto, Canada, June 29, 2018 --(PR.com)-- Opportunistic threat actors are leveraging trusted tools, like PowerShell, to retrieve and execute malicious code from remote sources.
However, tests done by the news site's technical team found no 'malicious code'.
Attacks from malicious code have become the predominant threat to the private information of computer users, say Feng and colleagues, because computer architecture lacks an immune system against malicious code.
As per the report, earlier, hackers used to send emails to random targets that would have attached files with malicious code. However, a new "targeted strike" strategy is apparently in vogue now.
Kaspersky Lab has alerted NetSarang, the vendor of the affected software, and it has promptly removed the malicious code and released an update for customers.