Malory


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Mal·o·ry

 (măl′ə-rē), Sir Thomas fl. 1470.
English writer of Le Morte d'Arthur, a collection of Arthurian romances adapted from French sources and published by William Caxton in 1485.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

Malory

(ˈmælərɪ)
n
(Biography) Sir Thomas. 15th-century English author of Le Morte d'Arthur (?1470), a prose collection of Arthurian legends, translated from the French
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

Mal•o•ry

(ˈmæl ə ri)

n.
Sir Thomas, c1400–71, English author.
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.Malory - English writer who published a translation of romances about King Arthur taken from French and other sources (died in 1471)Malory - English writer who published a translation of romances about King Arthur taken from French and other sources (died in 1471)
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
References in classic literature ?
From time to time I dipped into old Sir Thomas Malory's enchanting book, and fed at its rich feast of prodigies and adventures, breathed in the fragrance of its obsolete names, and dreamed again.
One of the first books he printed was Malory's Morte d'Arthur.
But the gentlemen persuaded Caxton until at last he undertook to "imprint a book of the noble histories of the said King Arthur and of certaine of his knights, after a copy unto me delivered, which copy Sir Thomas Malory tooke out of certaine bookes in the Frenche, and reduced it into English."
This is how Malory tells of the manner in which Arthur came to be king.
"And so anon was the coronation made," Malory goes on to tell us, "and there was Arthur sworn unto his lords and to the commons for to be a true king, to stand with true justice from henceforth the days of his life."
Besides which, although nearly all the words Malory uses are words we still use, the spelling is a little different, and that makes it more difficult to read.
Yet it is not perfect - it has indeed been called "a most pleasant jumble."* Malory made up none of the stories; as he himself tells us, he took them from French books, and in some of these French books the stories are told much better.
Saintsbury's well-considered Specimens of English Prose Style, from Malory to Macaulay (Kegan Paul), a volume, as we think, which bears fresh witness to the truth of the old remark that it takes a scholar indeed to make a [4] good literary selection, has its motive sufficiently indicated in the very original "introductory essay," which might well stand, along with the best of these extracts from a hundred or more deceased masters of English, as itself a document or standard, in the matter of prose style.
A tree expert is due to be sent by Telford & Wrekin Council to carry out a site visit to Malory Drive, Aqueduct, following the complaint.
1485: Morte D'Arthur by Sir Thomas Malory was published.
TEAM South Wales rounded off their season with a battling display against champions Malory Eagles, but it ended in a 3-0 defeat.
TN went on to complete a celebratory weekend in the capital by beating Malory Eagles 3-0 (25-18, 26-24, 25-17) - cementing them as this season's Super 8s champions.