mammon

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Mam·mon

 (măm′ən)
n.
1. Bible Riches, avarice, and worldly gain personified as a false god in the New Testament.
2. often mammon Material wealth regarded as having an evil influence.

[Middle English, from Late Latin mammon, from Greek mamōnās, from Aramaic māmonā, riches, probably from Mishnaic Hebrew māmôn; see ʔmn in Semitic roots.]

mammon

(ˈmæmən)
n
1. riches or wealth regarded as a source of evil and corruption
2. avarice or greed
[C14: via Late Latin from New Testament Greek mammōnas, from Aramaic māmōnā wealth]
ˈmammonish adj
ˈmammonism n
ˈmammonist, ˈmammonite n
ˌmammonˈistic adj

Mammon

(ˈmæmən)
n
(Bible) New Testament the personification of riches and greed in the form of a false god

mam•mon

(ˈmæm ən)

n.
riches or material wealth, esp. as an influence for evil or immorality. Matt. 6:24; Luke 16:9,11,13.
[1350–1400; < Late Latin < Greek < Aramaic māmōnā riches]
mam′mon•ism, n.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.mammon - wealth regarded as an evil influencemammon - wealth regarded as an evil influence
wealth, wealthiness - the state of being rich and affluent; having a plentiful supply of material goods and money; "great wealth is not a sign of great intelligence"
2.mammon - (New Testament) a personification of wealth and avarice as an evil spiritMammon - (New Testament) a personification of wealth and avarice as an evil spirit; "ye cannot serve God and Mammon"
New Testament - the collection of books of the Gospels, Acts of the Apostles, the Pauline and other epistles, and Revelation; composed soon after Christ's death; the second half of the Christian Bible
Translations

Mammon

[ˈmæmən] NMammón

mammon

nMammon m, → Reichtum m; Mammonder Mammon

mammon

[ˈmæmən] n (pej) (money) → mammona m or f
References in periodicals archive ?
Mammonists in The Tale of the Siskins are numerous.
The Tale of the Siskins depicts superficial mammonists and their daily life, and unveils the fragility of certain social values, including the legal system generally perceived as a yardstick as to reasonableness and legitimacy of social behaviour.