managerialism


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managerialism

(ˌmænɪˈdʒɪərɪəˌlɪzəm)
n
(Industrial Relations & HR Terms) the application of managerial techniques of businesses to the running of other organizations, such as the civil service or local authorities
ˌmanaˈgerialist n
References in periodicals archive ?
They also see a growing culture of university managerialism dominated by corporate vice-chancellors on an average fat-cat pay package of PS270,000.
It discusses how the idea of markets and consumerism dominates service delivery in the field, addressing Friedrich HayekAEs approach to markets and the influence on policy and the political debate on market economies; management and managerialism in social work; how risk dominates thinking in the field, including theories of risk society and moral panic; implications for the work of Pierre Bourdieu; recent developments in renewing the theory of stigma and how certain groups are oppressed by the modern neoliberal state; theories of poverty; and Leslie SklairAEs theory of globalization and implications for social work.
Labour's managerialism and centralist thinking are crippling the Welsh economy and leaving our public services languishing at the bottom of almost every league table," she wrote.
The corporate destruction of planet earth IS not 'despite' the corporate PR talk of sustainability 'but because of' it, reflecting the practices of what Managerialism calls 'corporate social responsibility' (Klikauer 2013).
Critical management studies, or CMS to those in the know, does not necessarily equal managerialism in what it advocates, nor top-down management in what it does.
The SNP Government have perfected the art of managerialism - making a devolved, limited-power parliament tick over under the control of a very orthodox, perhaps conservative, finance minister who is risk-averse.
Managerialism purportedly transforms political conflicts into technical problems to be resolved through the application of expert knowledge.
This level of scrutiny was not part of the traditional laissez-faire approach to art education experienced in previous eras and has come to be referred to as managerialism, which is understood as a pejorative term which is antithetical to the creation of successful artists (Buckley and Conomos, 2009: 9).
Yet the language of green managerialism could be about almost anything, from financial assets to university courses to medical services.
New managerialism as the means to deliver development
He added: "I hope the university will look again at how it can strengthen its procedures to protect and defend academic freedom, which this case exemplifies to be threatened from obtrusive managerialism.