manatee

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man·a·tee

 (măn′ə-tē′)
n.
Any of various herbivorous aquatic mammals of the genus Trichechus, having paddlelike front flippers and a horizontally flattened tail and found in warm coastal waters and rivers in Florida, northern South America, West Africa, and the Caribbean.

[Spanish manatí, from Cariban manati·.]

manatee

(ˈmænəˌtiː; ˌmænəˈtiː)
n
(Animals) any sirenian mammal of the genus Trichechus, occurring in tropical coastal waters of America, the Caribbean, and Africa: family Trichechidae. They resemble whales and have a prehensile upper lip and a broad flattened tail
[C16: via Spanish from Carib Manattouī]
ˈmanaˌtoid adj

man•a•tee

(ˈmæn əˌti, ˌmæn əˈti)

n., pl. -tees.
any plant-eating aquatic mammal of the genus Trichechus, of Caribbean and W Africa waters, having front flippers and a broad spoon-shaped tail.
[1545–55; < Sp manatí < Carib; associated with Latin manātus having hands]

man·a·tee

(măn′ə-tē′)
Any of various plant-eating water mammals living in rivers and bays along the tropical Atlantic Ocean. Manatees avoid contact with humans, have flippers shaped like paddles, and are more closely related to elephants than they are to dolphins or whales.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.manatee - sirenian mammal of tropical coastal waters of Americamanatee - sirenian mammal of tropical coastal waters of America; the flat tail is rounded
sea cow, sirenian, sirenian mammal - any of two families of large herbivorous aquatic mammals with paddle-shaped tails and flipper-like forelimbs and no hind limbs
genus Trichecus, Trichechus - type and sole genus of the Trichechidae
Translations
manato
manaatti
manatus
manat
海牛

manatee

[ˌmænəˈtiː] Nmanatí m

manatee

n(Rundschwanz)seekuh f

manatee

[ˌmænəˈtiː] n (mammal) → lamantino
References in classic literature ?
This dugong, which also bears the name of the halicore, closely resembles the manatee; its oblong body terminated in a lengthened tail, and its lateral fins in perfect fingers.
Although the neighboring marshes showed traces of the rhinoceros, the lamantine (or manatee), and the hippopotamus, he had no opportunity to see a single specimen of those animals.
When a man's fingers have been amputated, imperfect nails sometimes appear on the stumps: I could as soon believe that these vestiges of nails have appeared, not from unknown laws of growth, but in order to excrete horny matter, as that the rudimentary nails on the fin of the manatee were formed for this purpose.
Owen states, proves indisputably that it was intimately related to the Gnawers, the order which, at the present day, includes most of the smallest quadrupeds: in many details it is allied to the Pachydermata: judging from the position of its eyes, ears, and nostrils, it was probably aquatic, like the Dugong and Manatee, to which it is also allied.
Then came a picture of a cheerful and corpulent ecclesiastic in a shovel hat, sitting opposite a very thin European, and the inscription: "Lunch with Fra Cristofero at Rosario." Studies of women and babies accounted for several more pages, and then there was an unbroken series of animal drawings with such explanations as "Manatee upon Sandbank," "Turtles and Their Eggs," "Black Ajouti under a Miriti Palm"--the matter disclosing some sort of pig-like animal; and finally came a double page of studies of long-snouted and very unpleasant saurians.
The results of the model-selection procedures indicated that the best model to estimate annual adult-survival probabilities for Blue Spring manatees was one in which survival and sighting probabilities were constant over time ([Phi] p).
Hundreds of manatees, turtles and dolphins have washed up dead in the worst red tide since 2006.
Geological Survey scientists have developed the first laboratory test that can pick up traces of manatees genetic material in the waterways where they live.
The three other manatees in rehabilitation at the museum 6 Baca, Gale and Randall 6 "are all fine," according to museum officials.
The long-overdue decision that manatees are not endangered is welcome good news.
And don't touch the manatees; "let them touch you," he said.