mancala


Also found in: Wikipedia.

mancala

(mænˈkɑːlə)
n
(Games, other than specified) an African and Asian board game
Translations
mancala
References in periodicals archive ?
Men sat in groups and playing 'ajua' or mancala, a board game played with small stones, beans or seeds.
Palmera is competing in the Toguz Korgool event-a variation of the mancala game, which is better known as 'sungka' here in the Philippines- in the Nomad Games, an international competition for ethnic sports in Central Asia.
* African folk tale and mancala: 10-10:30 a.m., Du Quoin Public Library, 28 S.
Have you played mancala? Ugandans call this game of moving stones on a board "omweso."
Al Hawalees is the Omani version of Mancala, a board game that originated in Ghana in the 6th and 7th centuries.
Toguz korgool (literally, nine sheep droppings) is a game in the mancala family that is played in Central Asia.
In Kenya, visitors were able to make beeswax candles and mancala board games.
Eglash writes about discrete self-organizing in the Owari board game played throughout Africa in many different versions variously called ayo, bao, giuthi, lela, mancala, omweso, owari, tei, and songo, among many other names.
Some of these games already served a "serious" purpose; for example, Mancala (a game designed around 1400 BC) was used as an accounting tool for trading animals and food [2].
Years ago, de Voogt traveled to Zanzibar, a group of islands off the western coast of Africa, where people taught him to play a version of mancala. In this game, which is played all over the world, opponents move counters, such as pebbles, through a series of cup-shaped holes on a board.
In addition to these oral arts, Guji children play giricha (a stone-throwing game like jacks), duqo (a 'count and capture' game known elsewhere as mancala) and waatolcha (impressions), but attribute great significance to riddling and the processes of interrogation and interpretation that it involves.
The people there taught him how to play a game called mancala. In this game, players move counters around a series of cup-shaped holes on a board.