mandible

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man·di·ble

 (măn′də-bəl)
n.
1. The lower jaw of a vertebrate animal.
2. Either the upper or lower part of the beak in birds.
3. Any of various mouth organs of invertebrates used for seizing and biting food, especially either of a pair of such organs in insects and other arthropods.

[Middle English, from Old French, from Late Latin mandibula, from Latin mandere, to chew.]

man·dib′u·lar (-dĭb′yə-lər) adj.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

mandible

(ˈmændɪbəl)
n
1. (Zoology) the lower jawbone in vertebrates. See jaw1
2. (Zoology) either of a pair of mouthparts in insects and other arthropods that are usually used for biting and crushing food
3. (Zoology) ornithol either the upper or the lower part of the bill, esp the lower part
[C16: via Old French from Late Latin mandibula jaw, from mandere to chew]
mandibular adj
mandibulate n, adj
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

man•di•ble

(ˈmæn də bəl)

n.
1. the bone or bony composite comprising the lower jaw of vertebrates.
2. (in birds)
a. the lower part of the bill.
b. mandibles, the upper and lower parts of the bill.
3. (in arthropods) one of the first pair of mouthpart appendages, typically a biting organ.
[1375–1425; < Late Latin mandibula jaw =mandi- (comb. form of Latin mandere to chew) + Latin -bula suffix of means]
man•dib′u•lar (-ˈdɪb yə lər) man•dib′u•late, adj.
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.

man·di·ble

(măn′də-bəl)
1. The lower part of the jaw in vertebrate animals. See more at skeleton.
2. One of the pincer-like mouthparts of insects and other arthropods.
The American Heritage® Student Science Dictionary, Second Edition. Copyright © 2014 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

mandible


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The lower jawbone.
Dictionary of Unfamiliar Words by Diagram Group Copyright © 2008 by Diagram Visual Information Limited
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.mandible - the jaw in vertebrates that is hinged to open the mouthmandible - the jaw in vertebrates that is hinged to open the mouth
gnathion - the most inferior point of the mandible in the midline
gonion - the craniometric point on either side at the apex of the lower jaw
mandibular notch - small indentation in the middle of the lower jawbone
pogonion - the craniometric point that is the most forward-projecting point on the anterior surface of the chin
symphysion - the most forward point of the alveolar process of the mandible
articulator - a movable speech organ
condylar process, condyloid process, mandibular condyle - the condyle of the ramus of the mandible that articulates with the skull
coronoid process of the mandible - the coronoid process that provides an attachment for the temporal muscle
jaw - the part of the skull of a vertebrate that frames the mouth and holds the teeth
lantern jaw - a long thin lower jaw
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
Translations
kusadlo
MandibelUnterkiefer
alalõualuu
alaleuanluualaleukaleukaleukaraaja
kaakonderkaak

mandible

[ˈmændɪbl] Nmandíbula f
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005

mandible

n (of vertebrates)Unterkiefer(knochen) m, → Mandibel f (spec); mandibles (of insects)Mundwerkzeuge pl, → Mundgliedmaßen pl, → Mandibel f (spec); (of birds)Schnabel m
Collins German Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged 7th Edition 2005. © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1980 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1997, 1999, 2004, 2005, 2007

man·di·ble

n. mandíbula, hueso de la quijada en forma de herradura.
English-Spanish Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

mandible

n mandíbula inferior, mandíbula (fam)
English-Spanish/Spanish-English Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2006 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All rights reserved.
References in classic literature ?
"'Four membranous wings covered with little colored scales of metallic appearance; mouth forming a rolled proboscis, produced by an elongation of the jaws, upon the sides of which are found the rudiments of mandibles and downy palpi; the inferior wings retained to the superior by a stiff hair; antennae in the form of an elongated club, prismatic; abdomen pointed, The Death's -- headed Sphinx has occasioned much terror among the vulgar, at times, by the melancholy kind of cry which it utters, and the insignia of death which it wears upon its corslet.'"
How low in the scale of nature this law of battle descends, I know not; male alligators have been described as fighting, bellowing, and whirling round, like Indians in a war-dance, for the possession of the females; male salmons have been seen fighting all day long; male stag-beetles often bear wounds from the huge mandibles of other males.
It is as flat and elastic as an ivory paper-cutter, and the lower mandible, differing from every other bird, is an inch and a half longer than the upper.
Lesson states that he has seen these birds opening the shells of the mactrae buried in the sand-banks on the coast of Chile: from their weak bills, with the lower mandible so much projecting, their short legs and long wings, it is very improbable that this can be a general habit.
To sum up, then; in the Right Whale's there is no great well of sperm; no ivory teeth at all; no long, slender mandible of a lower jaw, like the Sperm Whale's.
In some crustaceans, including those called the phyllocarids, the mandibles were relatively tough, strengthened by the mineral calcite.
Head: coloration chestnut brown, mandibles dark black-brown, labrum light, and anterior frons pale.
The oldest remains were found in Late Pleistocene loessic sediments dated between 13.4 and 12.95 kyr BP in Las Juntas (28[degrees] 06' 36"S, 65[degrees] 53' 54"W, 1562 m, Ambato Department, Catamarca Province), consisting of 16 maxillae and 18 mandibles. The remains from Inca Cueva 4, layer 2 (23[degrees] 02' 55"S, 65[degrees] 25' 07"W, 3650 m, Humahuaca Department, Jujuy Province), come from the Pleistocene-Holocene boundary (dated between 11 and 9 kyr BP; Yacobaccio, 1991) and consist only of two mandibles.
Indeed, there is a growing body of evidence that the end results of treatments aimed at the midface are indistinguishable from those that are designed to "grow" mandibles.
The trap-jaw ant, Odontomachus bauri, snaps its fearsome mandibles shut in just 0.13 milliseconds ( 2,300 times faster than the blink of an eye.
The trap-jaw ant Odontomachus bauri, from central and south America, snaps its fearsome mandibles shut in a mere 0.13 milliseconds - 2,300 times faster than the blink of an eye, scientists have found.
"I've seen males use the mandibles for fighting," says Pinedo-Vasquez.