mangrove Jack

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Related to Mangrove red snapper: Mangrove jack

mangrove Jack

n
(Animals) a predatory food and game fish, Lutjanus argentimaculatus, of Australian rivers and tidal creeks dominated by mangroves
References in periodicals archive ?
In addition, Abbas and Siddiqui (2009) reported SGR 0.9 % to 2.2 % at different feeding levels of mangrove red snapper (Lutjanus argentimaculatus).
Similar individual tendency has been reported in rainbow trout Salmo gairdneri (Papoutsoglou and Papaparaskeva-Papoutsoglou, 1979; Hile 1982; Papoutsoglou and Voutsinos, 1988), mangrove red snapper Lutjanus argentimaculatus (Abbas and Siddiqui, 2013) and red-spotted grouper Epinephelus akaara (Kayano et al., 1993; Kang'ombe and Brown, 2008).
Primavera (1997) conducted a similar experiment using a mangrove red snapper predator (Lutjanus argentimaculatus) and also showed that predation on shrimp was significantly higher in sand than in medium-density pneumatophores.
A recent study by the environmental group Haribon Foundation showed that reef species, including African pompano (talakitok), giant grouper (kugtong) and the mangrove red snapper (maya-maya), were in danger of extinction due to increased demand resulting from overpopulation, overharvesting and illegal fishing.
Natural spawning and rearing of mangrove red snapper, Lutjanus argentimaculatus, larvae in captivity.
In addition, Abbas and Siddiqui (2009) reported SGR (0.9% to 2.2%) of mangrove red snapper (Lutjanus argentimaculatus) cultured at salinity level of 35%.
Among the species vulnerable to extinction due to overpopulation, overharvesting and illegal fishing are the humphead wrasse (mameng), bumphead parrotfish (taungan), giant grouper (kugtong), African pompano (talakitok) and the mangrove red snapper (a type of maya-maya).
Effect of dietary protein and lipid levels and protein to energy ratios on growth, survival and body composition of the mangrove red snapper, Lutjanus argentimaculatus (Forsskal 1775).
Effect of varying protein level on growth, feed conversion, body composition and apparent digestibility coefficient of juvenile mangrove red snapper, Lutjanus argentimaculatus (Forsskal 1775).
Similar trend was observed in Arctic char (Gurure et al., 1995), haddock (Kim and Lall, 2001), mangrove red snapper (Abbas and Siddiqui, 2013) and blackfin sea bream in the present study.
Higher growth of snapper accompanied with higher food conversion parallels the findings in other fishes of the same family, such as mangrove red snapper Lutjanus argentimaculatus (Abbas and Siddiqui, 2009; Abbas et al., 2011).
In order to investigate optimum dietary protein requirement, juvenile mangrove red snapper Lutjanus argentimaculatus (body weight 8.0+-0.3 g) were reared in seawater tanks (125 liters each) and fed one of the experimental diets at a daily ration of 2% body weight for 90 days.