Manhattan


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Related to Manhattan: Manhattan Project

Man·hat·tan 1

 (măn-hăt′n, mən-)
1. A borough of New York City in southeast New York, mainly on Manhattan Island at the north end of New York Bay. Peter Minuit of the Dutch West Indies Company bought the island in 1626 from the Manhattan Indians, supposedly for $24 worth of merchandise. The settlement of New Amsterdam, renamed New York when the English assumed control in 1664, quickly spread from the southern tip of the island, eventually becoming the financial and commercial center of the United States.
2. A city of northeast Kansas west of Topeka. It is the seat of Kansas State University (established 1863).

Man·hat′tan·ite′ (-īt′) n.

Man·hat·tan 2

also man·hat·tan  (măn-hăt′n, mən-)
n.
A cocktail made of sweet vermouth, whiskey, and a dash of bitters.

[After Manhattan1a borough of New York City.]

Manhattan

(mænˈhætən; mən-)
n
1. (Placename) an island at the N end of New York Bay, between the Hudson, East, and Harlem Rivers: administratively (with adjacent islets) a borough of New York City; a major financial, commercial, and cultural centre. Pop: 1 537 195 (2000). Area: 47 sq km (22 sq miles)
2. (Brewing) a mixed drink consisting of four parts whisky, one part vermouth, and a dash of bitters

Man•hat•tan

(mænˈhæt n, mən-)

n.
1. Also called Manhat′tan Is′land. an island in New York City surrounded by the Hudson, East, and Harlem rivers. 13½ mi. (22 km) long.
2. a borough of New York City approximately coextensive with Manhattan Island. 1,427,533.
3. (often l.c.) a cocktail of rye, vermouth, and bitters.
Man•hat′tan•ite`, n.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.Manhattan - one of the five boroughs of New York CityManhattan - one of the five boroughs of New York City
Greater New York, New York, New York City - the largest city in New York State and in the United States; located in southeastern New York at the mouth of the Hudson river; a major financial and cultural center
Fifth Avenue - an avenue in Manhattan that separates the east side of Manhattan from the west side
Seventh Avenue - an avenue in Manhattan that runs north and south
Central Park - a large park in Manhattan
Harlem - a district of Manhattan; now largely a Black ghetto
Hell's Half Acre, Hell's Kitchen - a district in Manhattan formerly noted for its slums and vice
SoHo, South of Houston - a district in southwestern Manhattan noted for its shops and restaurants and galleries and artist's lofts
Bowery - a street in Manhattan noted for cheap hotels frequented by homeless derelicts
Broadway, Great White Way - a street in Manhattan that passes through Times Square; famous for its theaters
Park Ave., Park Avenue - a fashionable residential street in New York City
off-Broadway - low-budget theaters located outside the Broadway area in Manhattan
Times Square - the area of Manhattan around the intersection of Broadway and Seventh Avenue; heart of the New York theater district; site of annual celebration of New Year's
Wall St., Wall Street - a street in lower Manhattan where the New York Stock Exchange is located; symbol of American finance
2.Manhattan - a cocktail made with whiskey and sweet vermouth with a dash of bittersmanhattan - a cocktail made with whiskey and sweet vermouth with a dash of bitters
Italian vermouth, sweet vermouth - sweet dark amber variety
whiskey, whisky - a liquor made from fermented mash of grain
cocktail - a short mixed drink
Rob Roy - a manhattan cocktail made with Scotch whiskey
References in classic literature ?
The very morning that his eldest child, Eudosia, made her valuable acquisition, in my person, Henry Halfacre, Esq., was the owner of several hundred lots on the island of Manhattan; of one hundred and twenty-three in the city of Brooklyn; of nearly as many in Williamsburg; of large undivided interests in Milwaukie, Chicago, Rock River, Moonville, and other similar places; besides owning a considerable part of a place called Coney Island.
As there is something, after all, in a historical name, and the Caverleys [sic] still had the best of it, in the way of society, Eudosia was permitted to continue the visits in White street, even after her own family were in full possession in Broadway, and Henry Halfacre, Esq., had got to be enumerated among the Manhattan nabobs.
The war with Spain, many years' generous mint and watermelon crops, a few long-shot winners at the New Orleans race-track, and the brilliant banquets given by the Indiana and Kansas citizens who compose the North Carolina Society have made the South rather a "fad" in Manhattan. Your manicure will lisp softly that your left forefinger reminds her so much of a gentleman's in Richmond, Va.
Notwithstanding the house of Miss Emmerson stood in the midst of the numberless villas that adorn Manhattan Island, the habits of its mistress were retiring and domestic.
{Highlands = the Hudson Highlands, a mountainous region in Putnam and Dutchess Counties, through which the Hudson River passes in a deep and picturesque gorge; Eolus = God of the winds; Boreas = God of the North wind; Seneca = one of the Finger Lakes in central New York State; Grecian king = both the Senecas of antiquity, the rhetorician (54 BC-39 AD) and his son the philosopher/statesman (4 BC-65 AD), were, of course, Romans--in any case, Lake Seneca is named after the Seneca nation of the Iroquois Indians; Park-Place = already in 1816 a fashionable street in lower Manhattan; Chippewa = an American army defeated the British at Chippewa, in Canada near Niagara Falls, on July 5, 1814; Lawrence = Captain James ("Don't give up the ship!") Lawrence (1781-
Archer and her son and daughter, like every one else in New York, knew who these privileged beings were: the Dagonets of Washington Square, who came of an old English county family allied with the Pitts and Foxes; the Lannings, who had intermarried with the descendants of Count de Grasse, and the van der Luydens, direct descendants of the first Dutch governor of Manhattan, and related by pre-revolutionary marriages to several members of the French and British aristocracy.
It was the peculiar shape of Manhattan Island, pressed in by arms of the sea on either side, and incapable of comfortable expansion, except along a narrow northward belt, that first gave the New York architects their bias for extreme vertical dimensions.
It obliged the Vaterland to come about in that direction, and made her roll a great deal as she went to and fro over Manhattan Island.
Sam pulled over, therefore, under the lee of Manhattan Island, and, coasting along, came to a snug nook, just under a steep, beetling rock, where he fastened his skiff to the root of a tree that shot out from a cleft, and spread its broad branches like a canopy over the water.
In a little while they stretched across Turtle Bay and Kip's Bay,[1] then shrouded themselves in the deep shadows of the Manhattan shore, and glided swiftly along, secure from observation.
But the highest triumph of wire-laying came when New York swept into the Skyscraper Age, and when hundreds of tall buildings, as high as the fall of the waters of Niagara, grew up like a range of magical cliffs upon the precious rock of Manhattan. Here the work of the telephone engineer has been so well done that although every room in these cliff-buildings has its telephone, there is not a pole in sight, not a cross-arm, not a wire.
1 June 2012 - US bank holding company Manhattan Bancorp (OTC:MNHN) said on Friday it had wrapped up the purchase of local Professional Business Bank, in line with an agreement signed in November 2011.