Manichaeus


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Manichaeus

(ˌmænɪˈkiːəs) or

Manicheus

n
(Biography) See Mani
References in periodicals archive ?
Ambrose thus applies the command against divorce in Luke 16:18 to signify the inviolable union between the believer and the Church: "Therefore, let not him whom God has drawn to the Son be separated by persecution, nor distracted by extravagance, nor ravaged by philosophy, nor tainted by Manichaeus, nor perverted by Arius, nor infected by Sabellius." Ambrose then summarizes his argument: "God has joined, let not a Jew separate.
The relation of this sermon to Vos inquam becomes clear in the next section, in which the homilist attacks the assertion of "the Jew" and the "accursed Manichaean" (detestandus Manichaeus) that a virgin cannot give birth.
As he comments on the importance of an unbroken tradition, he cites Saint Augustine (Book 28: Against Faustus Manichaeus, chapter 2:14).
Then he notes that "no author has hitherto completely denied the freedom of the will, save Manichaeus and John Wycliffe alone." Erasmus displays his Ciceronianism when he states, though he couches it in his "own opinion," the obvious point that his humanist colleagues would have known well and agreed with: "Their powerful and subtle argumentation, in my opinion, nobody can completely disdain." (26) From Erasmus's perspective, Luther's reliance on his own personal access to the divine spirit "completely disdained" the generations of "pious men."