Mannerheim


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Mannerheim

(ˈmænəˌheɪm)
n
(Biography) Baron Carl Gustaf Emil. 1867–1951, Finnish soldier and statesman; president of Finland (1944–46)
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014
References in periodicals archive ?
Finnish general and Knight of the Mannerheim Cross Adolf Ehrnrooth will reportedly be given a state funeral with military honours in Helsinki Cathedral on Saturday (13 March), the anniversary of the Winter War (1939-40) armistice.
The recently renovated Hotel Kamp features 179 luxurious rooms ranging from deluxe rooms to 15 suites - of which the largest and most opulent, Mannerheim Suite (258 sqm), begs a mention.
Finnish military chief--and later Finnish president--Carl Gustav Emil Mannerheim opted out of Finland's alliance with Germany to make a separate peace with Russia in 1944:
*Exema conspersa (Mannerheim, 1843) (Baja California Sur, Colima, Chiapas, Estado de Mexico, Guanajuato, Guerrero, Hidalgo, Jalisco, Michoacan, Morelos, Nayarit, Oaxaca, Puebla, Queretaro, Quintana Roo, San Luis Potosi, Sonora, Tamaulipas) (CEAM, CCFES-Z, UAT, CEFS)
By the spring of 1918, the Finns, under the command of Baron Carl Gustaf Mannerheim, had defeated the Reds, and drove the remaining Russian troops back across the border.
Captain Michitaro Komatsubara, formally accredited to Estonia as the 'Japanese Military Representative' (Jaapani sojavae esindaja) in June 1919, was in close contacts with Finnish Marshal Mannerheim and Estonian General Johan Laidoner.
All along, through their Lutheran faith and their pragmatic realism and through good leadership, from the great general of the Winter War and then president, Carl Gustaf Emil Mannerheim, followed by Urho Kekkonen and Mauno Koivisto the Finns have exemplified the difference between real victory and short-term conventional defeat.
The final section looks at leader cults, in particular, the place of O.W.Kuusinen, who is compared with the man popularly seen as the most meritorious and significant Finn in history, Marshal Mannerheim. The comparison is strictly developmental, in other words, how the leadership cult of the two men progressed over time.
Debate on this issue had started already during the Civil War, but was called to an end by the Commander-in-Chief of the Finnish Army, Marshal Mannerheim, who wrote in 1918:
(8) As the Finnish commander, Field Marshal Carl Gustav Mannerheim, had anticipated, the main thrust came across the Karelian Isthmus.