Mannheim School


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Mannheim School

(ˈmænhaɪm)
n
(Classical Music) music a group of musicians and composers connected with the court orchestra at Mannheim during the mid-18th century, who evolved the controlled orchestral crescendo as well as a largely homophonic musical style
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014
References in periodicals archive ?
With the second half of the 18th century having remained his favourite field of research, when Lang came to deal with the Mannheim school he paid due attention to the "importations from Bohemia".
Johann Stamitz was influential in the Mannheim School, a group of 18th-century composers in Germany, and helped shape the form of the sonata, paving the way for Haydn's and Mozart's efforts in that genre.
CONCERTOS OF THE MANNHEIM SCHOOL (DG Eloquence): With Christmas carols coming at you from every quarter for weeks on end anyway, why not opt instead for some really stylish music to accompany your Christmas dining?
Furi is also one of several soloists in concertos by composers of the crack mid-18th century Mannheim school, centred on a phenomenal orchestra whose discipline, attack and wizardry had such an influence on Mozart in his early 20s.
The techniques of the Mannheim school, especially the orchestral "rocket" and "sigh," were perfect matches with this new style of dramatic ballet.
This year's double Jan Vaclav Stamic anniversary (his dates are 19th June 1717-30th March 1757) is a good reason for a brief, overall consideration of the phenomenon, known as the Mannheim School, with which Stamic is so inseparably linked.
The Mannheim School in the sense of the phenomenon that is our subject here was formed in the environment of the Elector Palatine's Orchestra in Mannheim in the course of the 1740s.
In part one, for example, Rudolf Pecman begins his article on "The Mannheim School and Josef Myslivecek" by stating flatly that to his knowledge there are no connections between Mannhelm and Myslivecek; and of the eight articles on melodrama in part two, only one, Joachim Veit's fine study of Georg Joseph Vogler's Lampedo of 1779, actually concerns itself with Mannheim - and that mainly because Vogler was a Mannheimer; the work itself was written for the court at Darmstadt.
When John Newhill wrote that "the clarinet concerto as we know it today originated at Mannheim" ("The Contribution of the Mannheim School to Clarinet Literature," The Music Review 40 [1979]: 90), he referred to the coincidence of many disparate factors to make such an inception possible.