agar

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Related to Mannitol Salt Agar: blood agar, EMB agar, MacConkey agar

a·gar

 (ā′gär′, ä′gär′) also a·gar-a·gar (ā′gär-ā′gär′, ä′gär-ä′-)
n.
1. A gelatinous material derived from certain marine algae. It is used as a base for bacterial culture media and as a stabilizer and thickener in many food products.
2. A culture medium containing this material.

[Short for Malay agar-agar.]
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

agar

(ˈeɪɡə)
n
(Elements & Compounds) a complex gelatinous carbohydrate obtained from seaweeds, esp those of the genus Gelidium, used as a culture medium for bacteria, a laxative, in food such as ice cream as a thickening agent (E406), etc. Also called: agar-agar
[C19: Malay]
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

a•gar

(ˈɑ gɑr, ˈæg ər)

n.
1. Also, a′gar-a′gar.a gel prepared from the cell walls of various red algae, used in laboratories as a culture medium, in food processing as a thickener and stabilizer, and in industry as a filler, adhesive, etc.
2. a culture medium having an agar base.
[1885–90; < Malay agaragar]
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.

a·gar

(ā′gär′, ä′gär′)
A jelly-like material obtained from marine algae, especially seaweed. It is used as a medium for growing bacterial cultures in the laboratory and as a thickener and stabilizer in food products.
The American Heritage® Student Science Dictionary, Second Edition. Copyright © 2014 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.agar - any culture medium that uses agar as the gelling agentagar - any culture medium that uses agar as the gelling agent
culture medium, medium - (bacteriology) a nutrient substance (solid or liquid) that is used to cultivate micro-organisms
agar-agar, agar - a colloidal extract of algae; used especially in culture media and as a gelling agent in foods
blood agar - a culture medium containing whole blood as the nutrient
2.agar - a colloidal extract of algaeagar - a colloidal extract of algae; used especially in culture media and as a gelling agent in foods
gum - any of various substances (soluble in water) that exude from certain plants; they are gelatinous when moist but harden on drying
agar, nutrient agar - any culture medium that uses agar as the gelling agent
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
Translations
agar

agar

[ˈeɪgəʳ] agar-agar [ˌeɪgərˈeɪgəʳ] nagar-agar m inv
Collins Italian Dictionary 1st Edition © HarperCollins Publishers 1995
References in periodicals archive ?
Currently the main phenotypic methods being used for the detection of MRSA include traditional disc diffusion method (Modified Kirby-Bauer and Stokes methods); broth microdilution method determining minimal inhibitory concentration (MIC); E Test method; breakpoint method; agar dilution method (oxacillin/methicillin screen agar, mannitol salt agar, isosensi test agar, chromogenic agar)8; automated system methods: Vitek 2, Microscan Walkaway9; and latex agglutination method to detect mecA gene product i.e., PBP2a.10 The genotypic methods confirm the existence or nonexistence of mecA gene in methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus isolates by polymerase chain reaction.11.
The colonies were sub cultured on selective media like mannitol salt agar which showed yellow coloured colonies indicating mannitol fermentation and phenolphthalein diphosphate agar where the colonies turned pink on exposure to ammonia.
Colonies so obtained on nutrient agar plates were further identified on the basis of a) Microscopic analysis: Gram reaction and morphology b) Colony morphology c) Catalase reaction d) Coagulase test e) Mannitol fermentation and growth on selective medium i.e Mannitol salt agar (MSA).Strains isolated were later stored as slants at 4[degrees]C till further use.
Upon arrival to the laboratory, clinical samples were cultured on blood and MacConkey agar plates while nasal swabs were streaked onto mannitol salt agar plates.
For the routine culture, the aspirate was plated to sheep blood agar, chocolate agar, MacConkey agar, mannitol salt agar and esculin agar, along with a thioglycollate broth.
Further the broth culture was inoculated on different selective and differential media like Nutrient agar, Brain heart infusion agar, Mannitol salt agar, Mac Conkey Lactose agar and Eosine methylene blue agar and then incubated at 37 (o) C for 24 hours.
All isolates were confirmed by Gram staining, growth on mannitol salt agar and biochemical tests such as catalase, coagulase and DNase tests.
The nasal swab sample were inoculated on blood agar and mannitol salt agar. After 24 hours of incubation at 37AdegC, the suspected S.
After incubation, samples were spread on Mannitol Salt Agar (Oxoid), Baird-Parker Agar (Difco), Cetrimide Agar (Difco), MacConkey Agar (Difco), Eozine Methylene Blue Agar (Difco), Fluid Tetrathionate Medium (Difco), Xylose-Lysine Deoxycholate Agar (Difco), Bismuth Sulfite Agar (Difco) and Enterococcosel Agar (Difco) to determine the presence of specific microorganisms according to pharmacopeia (USP 2009).
Pus and burns specimens and sputum were inoculated on blood agar, chocolate agar, mannitol salt agar. One set of all plates were incubated aerobically at 37degC and the other set was incubated for partial anaerobic incubation at 10% CO2 incubatory for 24-48 hours.
For analysis of surfaces and utensils, after collection of samples using sterile swab soaked in saline solution, these were seeded in Mannitol Salt Agar, using the depletion technique (qualitative method), and after seeding, these were incubated at 36 [+ or -] 2[degrees]C / 18-24 h for subsequent visual analysis, where the samples with Staphylococcus characteristic colonies were seeded onto TSA-containing plaques (Tryptic Soya Agar, Himedia) and incubated in an oven at 36 [+ or -] 2[degrees]C / 18-24 h for growth and isolation.