plume

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plume

a soft, fluffy feather: the plume of an egret; emissions from a stack, flue, or chimney: a plume of smoke
Not to be confused with:
plum – an oval, fleshy, edible fruit: He stuck in his thumb and pulled out a plum.
plumb – exactly vertical: plumb in the center; determine the depth of; experience in extremes: plumb the depths of fear; provide with plumbing; work as a plumber
Abused, Confused, & Misused Words by Mary Embree Copyright © 2007, 2013 by Mary Embree
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plume

plume

 (plo͞om)
n.
1. A feather, especially a large and showy one.
2. A large feather, cluster of feathers, or similar ornament worn on a helmet, hat, or horse's harness.
3. A token of honor or achievement.
4. A mass or stream of material that resembles a long feather: a plume of smoke.
5. An area or section of air, water, or soil containing pollutants released from a point source.
6. Geology An upwelling of molten material from the earth's mantle.
v. plumed, plum·ing, plumes
tr.v.
1. To decorate, cover, or supply with a plume or plumes: "Her black velvet hat was plumed with a spray of violets" (Jim Rasenberger).
2. To smooth or clean (feathers) with the bill or beak; preen.
3. To congratulate (oneself) in a self-satisfied way: plumed himself on his victory.
intr.v.
To rise or emanate in a plume: Smoke plumed from the chimney.

[Middle English, from Old French, from Latin plūma.]
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

plume

(pluːm)
n
1. a feather, esp one that is large or ornamental
2. a feather or cluster of feathers worn esp formerly as a badge or ornament in a headband, hat, etc
3. (Biology) biology any feathery part, such as the structure on certain fruits and seeds that aids dispersal by wind
4. something that resembles a plume: a plume of smoke.
5. a token or decoration of honour; prize
6. (Geological Science) geology a rising column of hot, low viscosity material within the earth's mantle, which is believed to be responsible for linear oceanic island chains and flood basalts. Also called: mantle plume
vb (tr)
7. to adorn or decorate with feathers or plumes
8. (Zoology) (of a bird) to clean or preen (itself or its feathers)
9. (foll by: on or upon) to pride or congratulate (oneself)
[C14: from Old French, from Latin plūma downy feather]
ˈplumeless adj
ˈplumeˌlike adj
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

plume

(plum)

n., v. plumed, plum•ing. n.
1. a large, long, or conspicuous feather.
2. any plumose part or formation.
3. a feather or tuft of feathers worn as an ornament, token of honor or distinction, etc.
5. a rising or expanding fluid body, as of smoke or water, with a plumose shape.
v.t.
6. to adorn with plumes.
7. (of a bird) to preen (itself or its feathers).
8. to feel complacent satisfaction with (oneself); pride (oneself) (often fol. by on or upon).
[1350–1400; earlier plome, plume, Middle English plume < Middle French < Latin plūma soft feather]
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.

plume

(plo͞om)
1. Zoology A feather, especially a large one.
2. Geology A body of magma that rises from the Earth's mantle into the crust. ♦ If a plume rises to the Earth's surface, it erupts as lava. ♦ If it remains below the Earth's surface, it eventually solidifies into a body of rock known as a pluton.
3. Ecology An area in air, water, soil, or rock containing pollutants released from a single source. A plume often spreads in the environment due to the action of wind, currents, or gravity.
The American Heritage® Student Science Dictionary, Second Edition. Copyright © 2014 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

Plume

 anything resembling a plume of feathers or a tuft of waving hair.
Examples: plume of distinction, 1848; of feathers, 1711; curling plumes of hair, 1870; of smoke, 1878; plumes of the woodland, 1859.
Dictionary of Collective Nouns and Group Terms. Copyright 2008 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.

plume


Past participle: plumed
Gerund: pluming

Imperative
plume
plume
Present
I plume
you plume
he/she/it plumes
we plume
you plume
they plume
Preterite
I plumed
you plumed
he/she/it plumed
we plumed
you plumed
they plumed
Present Continuous
I am pluming
you are pluming
he/she/it is pluming
we are pluming
you are pluming
they are pluming
Present Perfect
I have plumed
you have plumed
he/she/it has plumed
we have plumed
you have plumed
they have plumed
Past Continuous
I was pluming
you were pluming
he/she/it was pluming
we were pluming
you were pluming
they were pluming
Past Perfect
I had plumed
you had plumed
he/she/it had plumed
we had plumed
you had plumed
they had plumed
Future
I will plume
you will plume
he/she/it will plume
we will plume
you will plume
they will plume
Future Perfect
I will have plumed
you will have plumed
he/she/it will have plumed
we will have plumed
you will have plumed
they will have plumed
Future Continuous
I will be pluming
you will be pluming
he/she/it will be pluming
we will be pluming
you will be pluming
they will be pluming
Present Perfect Continuous
I have been pluming
you have been pluming
he/she/it has been pluming
we have been pluming
you have been pluming
they have been pluming
Future Perfect Continuous
I will have been pluming
you will have been pluming
he/she/it will have been pluming
we will have been pluming
you will have been pluming
they will have been pluming
Past Perfect Continuous
I had been pluming
you had been pluming
he/she/it had been pluming
we had been pluming
you had been pluming
they had been pluming
Conditional
I would plume
you would plume
he/she/it would plume
we would plume
you would plume
they would plume
Past Conditional
I would have plumed
you would have plumed
he/she/it would have plumed
we would have plumed
you would have plumed
they would have plumed
Collins English Verb Tables © HarperCollins Publishers 2011
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.plume - anything that resembles a feather in shape or lightness; "a plume of smoke"; "grass with large plumes"
shape, form - the spatial arrangement of something as distinct from its substance; "geometry is the mathematical science of shape"
2.plume - a feather or cluster of feathers worn as an ornamentplume - a feather or cluster of feathers worn as an ornament
adornment - a decoration of color or interest that is added to relieve plainness
aigret, aigrette - a long plume (especially one of egret feathers) worn on a hat or a piece of jewelry in the shape of a plume
panache - a feathered plume on a helmet
3.plume - the light horny waterproof structure forming the external covering of birdsplume - the light horny waterproof structure forming the external covering of birds
bird - warm-blooded egg-laying vertebrates characterized by feathers and forelimbs modified as wings
down, down feather - soft fine feathers
aftershaft - a supplementary feather (usually small) on the underside of the base of the shaft of some feathers in some birds
contour feather - feathers covering the body of an adult bird and determining its shape
spurious wing, alula - tuft of small stiff feathers on the first digit of a bird's wing
marabou - the downy feathers of marabou storks are used for trimming garments
web, vane - the flattened weblike part of a feather consisting of a series of barbs on either side of the shaft
hackle - long slender feather on the necks of e.g. turkeys and pheasants
quill, calamus, shaft - the hollow spine of a feather
flight feather, quill feather, pinion, quill - any of the larger wing or tail feathers of a bird
scapular - a feather covering the shoulder of a bird
body covering - any covering for the body or a body part
ceratin, keratin - a fibrous scleroprotein that occurs in the outer layer of the skin and in horny tissues such as hair, feathers, nails, and hooves
animal material - material derived from animals
melanin - insoluble pigments that account for the color of e.g. skin and scales and feathers
Verb1.plume - rip off; ask an unreasonable price
extort, gouge, wring, rack, squeeze - obtain by coercion or intimidation; "They extorted money from the executive by threatening to reveal his past to the company boss"; "They squeezed money from the owner of the business by threatening him"
cheat, rip off, chisel - deprive somebody of something by deceit; "The con-man beat me out of $50"; "This salesman ripped us off!"; "we were cheated by their clever-sounding scheme"; "They chiseled me out of my money"
2.plume - be proud of; "He prides himself on making it into law school"
feel, experience - undergo an emotional sensation or be in a particular state of mind; "She felt resentful"; "He felt regret"
3.plume - deck with a plume; "a plumed helmet"
bedeck, bedight, deck - decorate; "deck the halls with holly"
4.plume - clean with one's bill; "The birds preened"
arrange, set up - put into a proper or systematic order; "arrange the books on the shelves in chronological order"
clean, make clean - make clean by removing dirt, filth, or unwanted substances from; "Clean the stove!"; "The dentist cleaned my teeth"
5.plume - form a plume; "The chimneys were pluming the sky"; "The engine was pluming black smoke"
shape, form - give shape or form to; "shape the dough"; "form the young child's character"
6.plume - dress or groom with elaborate care; "She likes to dress when going to the opera"
attire, deck out, deck up, dress up, fancy up, fig out, fig up, rig out, tog out, tog up, trick out, trick up, gussy up, overdress, prink, get up - put on special clothes to appear particularly appealing and attractive; "She never dresses up, even when she goes to the opera"; "The young girls were all fancied up for the party"
dress, get dressed - put on clothes; "we had to dress quickly"; "dress the patient"; "Can the child dress by herself?"
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.

plume

noun feather, crest, quill, pinion, aigrette straw hats decorated with ostrich plumes
Collins Thesaurus of the English Language – Complete and Unabridged 2nd Edition. 2002 © HarperCollins Publishers 1995, 2002

plume

verb
To be proud of (oneself), as for an accomplishment or achievement:
The American Heritage® Roget's Thesaurus. Copyright © 2013, 2014 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.
Translations
ريش، زينَة ريش
péro
fjer
skrautfjöîur
spalvaspalvu pušķis

plume

[pluːm]
A. N (= feather) → pluma f; (on helmet) → penacho m (fig) [of smoke etc] → columna f, hilo m
B. VT the bird plumes itselfel ave se limpia or se arregla las plumas
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005

plume

[ˈpluːm] n
a plume of smoke → une colonne de fumée
(= feather) [bird] → plume f
the plumes of the helmet → le plumet du casque
[plant] → aigrette f
Collins English/French Electronic Resource. © HarperCollins Publishers 2005

plume

nFeder f; (on helmet) → Federbusch m; plume of smokeRauchwolke f, → Rauchfahne f; a plume of watereine Wasserfontäne; in borrowed plumesmit fremden Federn geschmückt
vr
(bird) → sich putzen
to plume oneself on somethingauf etw (acc)stolz sein wie ein Pfau
Collins German Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged 7th Edition 2005. © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1980 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1997, 1999, 2004, 2005, 2007

plume

[pluːm] npiuma, penna; (on hat, helmet) → penna, pennacchio
a plume of smoke → un pennacchio di fumo
Collins Italian Dictionary 1st Edition © HarperCollins Publishers 1995

plume

(pluːm) noun
a large decorative feather. She wore a plume in her hat.
Kernerman English Multilingual Dictionary © 2006-2013 K Dictionaries Ltd.
References in periodicals archive ?
Two competing paradigms explain these cataclysms, either by the splitting of tectonic plates at the Earth's surface or by the impacts of hot currents, called mantle plumes, from the planetary interior.
Mantle plumes are the main dynamic upwelling process for negatively buoyant material and these originate at the outer core-mantle boundary.
These results of the Galapagos experiment point to an alternative explanation: the lower mantle may well resist convection, and instead only bring heat to the surface in the form of mantle plumes such as the ones creating Galapagos and Hawaii," Nolet explains.
"Our results strongly support a deep origin for the Yellowstone hotspot, and also provide evidence for the existence of thin thermal mantle plumes that are currently beyond the resolution of global tomography models," he said.
"That will help us further constrain the source of the magma because rocks from deep mantle plumes and near-surface tectonic plates could have different chemistries."
Hot spots offer a window into the depths of Earth, as they mark the tops of mantle plumes that carry hot, buoyant rock from deep Earth to near the surface and produce volcanoes.
Volcanism away from plate boundaries has also been explained as mantle plumes. These so-called "hotspots", for example Hawaii, are postulated to arise from up-welling diapirs with magma from the core - mantle boundary, 3,000 km deep in the Earth.
Investigators suggest that volcanic chains in the middle of tectonic plates, such as the Hawaiian Islands, are caused by giant pillars of hot molten rock known as mantle plumes. These rise up from near the Earth's core, penetrating overlying material like a blowtorch.
Most important, perhaps, has been the overall shift in thinking away from general geology and economics and towards tectonics, with much of the volcanic activity east of the Cascade Mountains now being attributed to hot spots or mantle plumes. They have also added some historical photographs and biographical sketches of early geologists in the state.
While the core heat is mostly transported outwards by mantle plumes, the sinking of cold, subducted plate material is balanced by a pervasive warm counter flow, transporting the mantle-generated radiogenic heat.