manualism


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manualism

the teaching of communication through the use of hand signals to the deaf. — manualist, n.
See also: Deafness
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Reassessing the importance of deaf educator Jane Elizabeth Groom's emigration scheme, which relocated unemployed deaf Britons to the Canadian prairies, and disclosing the eugenic resistance it met with by Bell and the father of eugenics, Francis Galton, Esmail shows how deaf advocators of manualism responded to eugenics with a "social constructivist model of deafness," which identified disability not in deaf bodies but in the social prejudices against the deaf (154).
Haring drafted the document, so it is no surprise that its emphases on Scripture, on charity, (45) and on the exalted vocation of discipleship capture the synthesis of the revisionist vision that replaces manualism.
99) With McCormick, the "Notes" are no longer the last bastion of manualism.
The defining characteristic of moral manualism, as Keenan describes it, is its reliance on rules for moral behavior.
Manualism did not appear important for basic religious instruction at the girls' school.
Increasingly manualism would be replaced in the institutions of deaf education by oralism, which taught lip-reading and speech, usually with poor results and at the expense of adequate early language development.
Borquillon, a Belgian diocesan priest, was Catholic University of America's first moral theologian; a progressive, he denounced manualism and befriended and influenced the liberal wing of the American hierarchy.
His account traces modern proportionalism from its roots in double-effect reasoning in Aquinas and late neo-Scholastic manualism (according to French Jesuit Jean Pierre Gury) and concludes that proportionalism "partially rejects, but fully presupposes" (209) the theology of the manuals (most notably in marginalizing the virtues) rather than representing a return to Thomas.
divides the second part (a mere 420 pages) into an historical overview of the various methodological periods of moral theology (Scholasticism, casuistry, manualism, etc.
Since the demise of manualism (and the corresponding rejection of neo-Thomism), theologians writing from a Thomist perspective have struggled to find an approach that engages an audience outside the boundaries of historical theology.
Ingenious, because he used it to establish his own apparently innovative claims as traditional precisely as he broke with the theology of the historical period immediately before his, that is, the manualism of the 17th through the 20th century.
Besides making changes in the method of casuistry and the role of the casuist, we are also departing from the content of manualism.

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