Manuduction


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Man`u`duc´tion


n.1.Guidance by the hand.
Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary, published 1913 by G. & C. Merriam Co.
References in periodicals archive ?
(20) On the difference between the open and the closed book, see Peter Candler, Theology, Rhetoric, Manuduction, or Reading Scripture Together on the Path to God (Grand Rapids, MI: William B.
Candler, Jr., Theology, Rhetoric, Manuduction, or Reading Scripture Together on the Path to God (Grand Rapids, Michigan: Eerdmans, 2006), 7, 9, 15, 18, 27, 38-39, 50, 66, 74, 77-82, 151-60, and 162; Peter van der Coelen, "Pictures for the People?
Rather than draw attention to the rhetorical artistry or the classical literary terms that Bede employs, I have focused this study on Bede's portrayal of apostolic manuduction ("leading by the hand") (4) and his use of "temple" imagery (5) as a way to draw out some of the implications and pedagogical purposes of Bede's own hermeneutical approach.
(22) Meeting a term like 'confutation' on the title-page would hail a reader into an area, somewhat fuzzy, which was slightly different from where he went when the author hailed him by a 'refutation' or a 'manuduction'.
Dialogical, intertextual theological reading is communal, informed by liturgical intonations of and devotional meditations on biblical texts, framed by ongoing annotations from doctors of the church who lead apprentice Christians by the hand (i.e., "manuduction") in mutually re-membering Christ's Body (43-45).
The textual form, therefore, is not separable from the manuduction of the soul toward beatific vision.
(48)Thomas James, A Manuduction, or Introduction unto Divinitie: Containing a Confutation of Papists by Papists ([London], 1625, S.T.C.