Manx cat


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Manx cat

n
(Breeds) a short-haired tailless variety of cat, believed to originate on the Isle of Man
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

Manx′ cat′


n.
one of a breed of shorthaired, usu. tailless domestic cats.
[1855–60]
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.Manx cat - a short-haired tailless breed of cat believed to originate on the Isle of ManManx cat - a short-haired tailless breed of cat believed to originate on the Isle of Man
domestic cat, Felis catus, Felis domesticus, house cat - any domesticated member of the genus Felis
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
In my mind's eye, I was still pestering my parents for a lucky black Manx cat badge.
We watched traditional dancing, petted a tailless Manx cat, made herbal charms and peg doll witches.
The only problem here is their tail is as long as that of a Manx cat.
"Bangle Bear" is the true, heartwarming story of a gray striped Manx cat, adopted as an adult from an animal shelter by the author.
Manx2.com Chairman Noel Hayes, RAF Valley Wing Commander Glenn Cockerill and Squadron Leader Mark Byrne with mascot Manx Cat
"GrimJack: The Manx Cat #1" is a welcome return to one of the most imaginative British science fiction worlds ever created.
Manx (mangcks) The Manx cat was developed on the Isle of Man off the coast of England.
And I didn't spot a tail-less Manx cat nor a Manx four-horned Loaghtan sheep, nor a polecat or wallaby (yes, they live wild on the isle).
He looked down and saw a big gray Manx cat with no tail trying to push his head through the crack of the slightly opened front door.
In her "Prologue," Hermann notes how two independent observers--a character in Elizabeth Gaskell's Mary Barton (1848) and the speaker in Woolf's A Room of One's Own (1929) call the Manx cat "queer." Both are rendered speechless by its appearance.
She looks forward to getting her belongings out of storage and moving back into the house she leased out in her absence, settling back down with Ripley and a female Manx cat named George.