Mapai


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Mapai

“Miphlegeth Poalei Israel” A workers’ party formed by Jewish immigrants in Palestine in 1930 and serving in Israeli coalition governments 1948–77. In 1968 it combined with smaller socialist parties to form the modern Israeli Labor Party.
References in periodicals archive ?
(i) Mapai dam or equivalent optional solutions validated by stakeholders and GoM, as the preferred solution for building resilience to climate change including flood attenuation, dry season water availability; enhanced livelihood and food security, reduced poverty, and reduced greenhouse gas emissions; and
In the second half of the 1940s, Ben-Gurion called Silver Mapai's most dangerous enemy.
(12.) Among the participants in this meeting were: Yigal Allon (who held many ministerial positions), Abba Hushi, Shmouel Tolidano, Roeven Bareket (who held the position of the general secretary of MAPAI), David Zcharia (held many position in MAPAI, including the head of the Party's Arab department), Amnon Linn (a long standing Arabist in MAPAI, the Labor Party and later in The Likud Party), Yackov 'Aini (Arabists and MAPAI's activist in the Histadrut's Arab section) and Gadish (an Arabist and a former mayor of Acre).
Such patronage was characteristic of all political parties, especially Mapai (then Labor), who took over the state apparatus and filled it with loyal party and labor union leader.
Wishing to preserve their nationalist image, neither the Mapai nor Herut party had a major incentive to dismantle the Military Government.
In the early 1940s, there was a split in Mapai, the almighty ruling party in the Yishuv (the Jewish community in Palestine).
One member was Ben-Gurion, head of the Jewish Agency and leader of the dominant, leftwing party, Mapai. Ben-Gurion admired the British system, which he called "the most efficient political system in the world." In particular, he was impressed that the British had managed to maintain their "political freedom even during the storm of war." More broadly, he felt that it struck a healthy balance between representation and governability.
He continued to be active in public life until his death in 2006, serving in the Knesset for Ben-Gurion's Mapai Party, teaching literature at Hebrew University and education at Tel Aviv University, and writing political and social commentary for a leading newspaper.
At the disposal of writers controlled by the ruling party MAPAI were several Arabic literary organs such as the newspaper al-Yawm (The Day), which ran from 1948 to 1968, the weekly Haqiqat al-Amr (The True Matter), which stayed in circulation from 1937 to 1959, and the monthly al-Mujtama' (The Society), which was in print from 1954 to 1959.
In general, American Jewish public opinion swung overwhelmingly in support of the Zionist policies and program of the Palestine-based coalition grouped around David Ben-Gurion and the socialist Mapai party which, starting in the mid-1930s, assumed a central position in the World Zionist Organization, in the Jewish Agency for Palestine, and in the Yishuv's affairs.
He returned to Israel in early 1959, winning election to the Knesset on the Mapai ticket and serving in the successive Labor Party cabinets of David Ben-Gurion, Levi Eshkol, and Golda Meir, as education minister, deputy prime minister, and eventually foreign minister, a post he held from 1966 to 1974.
The hegemonic party MAPAI (the Land of Israel Workers' Party), and, later on, other Zionist parties - such as the National Religious Party (MAFDAL) - managed to manipulate these divisions in order to further their goals, i.e., gaining influence and securing a percentage of the Arab vote in the general elections.