Mapudungun


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Ma·pu·dun·gun

 (mä′po͞o-do͞on′go͞on)
n.

[Mapuche : mapu, earth + dungun, speech.]
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.
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To exemplify this only for the data given in Table 2, the situations 1:25 and 1:26 have a distance value of 2/8, because of the eight attested pairs two (Mapudungun, Tobelo) are different.
This article illustrates how Mapuche Indigenous knowledge (Kimun) and language (Mapudungun) incorporated into an Intercultural Bilingual Education (IBE) program of a school within a Mapuche context in Chile creates decolonizing counter-hegemonic narratives as forms of culturally relevant pedagogy.
Following are chapters grouped in sections pertaining to the languages of Africa (six of them: !Xun, Emai, Yoruba, Baule, Joola Banjal, and Tima); Eurasia (Telkepe, Vafsi, East Caucasian family, Tungusic, Ket, Chintang and Belhare, and Thai); New Guinea and Australia (Teiwa, Mian, Teop, Jaminjung); the Americas (Yupik, Halkomelem Salish, Athabaskan), Ojiebwe, Tlapaniec, Itonama, and Mapudungun).
La Iglesia Catolica, al favorecer la ensenanza religiosa en lenguas locales (mapudungun, guarani, quechua, nahuatl, por ejemplo) atenta contra la hegemonia imperial sin saberlo.
Tehuelche (a Mapudungun word meaning 'fierce people') is a collective term for the indigenous nomadic tribal peoples of Patagonia and the pampas.