Marburg disease

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Related to Marburg virus disease: Marburg hemorrhagic fever, African hemorrhagic fever

Marburg disease

n
(Pathology) a severe, sometimes fatal, viral disease of the green monkey, which may be transmitted to humans. Symptoms include fever, vomiting, and internal bleeding. Also called: green monkey disease
[C20 after Marburg, in which the first human cases were recorded]

Mar′burg disease`


n.
a viral disease producing a severe and often fatal illness with fever, rash, diarrhea, vomiting, and gastrointestinal bleeding, transmitted to humans through contact with infected green monkeys.Also called green monkey disease, Mar′burg-Eb′o•la disease` (ˈɛb ə lə)
[after Marburg, where laboratory workers caught the disease from infected monkeys in 1967; and Ebola, river and region in the N Democratic Republic of the Congo, where an outbreak occurred in 1976]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.Marburg disease - a viral disease of green monkeys caused by the Marburg virusMarburg disease - a viral disease of green monkeys caused by the Marburg virus; when transmitted to humans it causes serious or fatal illness
haemorrhagic fever, hemorrhagic fever, VHF, viral haemorrhagic fever, viral hemorrhagic fever - a group of illnesses caused by a viral infection (usually restricted to a specific geographic area); fever and gastrointestinal symptoms are followed by capillary hemorrhage
References in periodicals archive ?
Last month, the Ugandan Ministry of Health notified WHO of a confirmed outbreak of Marburg virus disease in the Kween district of eastern Uganda.
WHO is working to contain an outbreak of Marburg virus disease (MVD) that has appeared in eastern Uganda on the border with Kenya.
Marburg virus disease (MVD) is caused by Marburg virus (MARV; family Filoviridae, which also includes Ebola viruses).
Blood specimens collected from both patients were sent for testing for Marburg virus disease, Ebola virus disease, Rift Valley fever (RVF), and Crimean Congo Hemorrhagic fever at the Uganda Virus Research Institute, as part of the viral hemorrhagic fevers surveillance program.
A meta-analysis of the risk factors for transmission of Ebola or Marburg virus disease found that transmission of any African filovirus is unlikely except through close contact, especially during the most severe stages of acute illness.