Marcassin

Mar`cas´sin


n.1.(Her.) A young wild boar.
Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary, published 1913 by G. & C. Merriam Co.
References in periodicals archive ?
"I tasted Marcassin 2004 Blue Slide Ridge Pinot Noir and didn't know a wine could taste like that.
She led the ripeness movement of the 1990s with her own Marcassin Chardonnay and Pinot Noir and the wines of her employers and consulting clients, including Napa Valley wineries Bryant Family Vineyard, Colgin Cellars, Pahlmeyer Winery and her brother's Turley Wine Cellars.
There are so many marquee Pinot wineries in the region with signature names like Rochioli, Hirsch, Marcassin, Kistler and Williams Selyem.
She will be using an example of Frink's work on paper Marcassin which is currently on loan from Exhall Grange School in Coventry.
Part II studies character-types in the tales: good and bad fairies (who are also author-surrogates); animals (generally secondary roles unless they are royals metamorphosed: Le Prince marcassin and the like); fathers and mothers (the latter stronger if also crueller).
Despite the proven successes of native yeast fermentations (Kistler, Ridge, Ravenswood, Sterling, Signorello, Marcassin, Chalk Hill, Frog's Leap, Franciscan), little is heard about the quantities of wine sold-off in bulk due to failed wild yeast fermentations.
288); Anguillette (Murat 1698); d'Aulnoy's Le prince Marcassin (1698); Murat's Le roy Porc (1699); la fee Serpente (d'Auneuil 1702; Warner, p.
Though Turley is known for the Cabernets she's made at Cohn and Peter Michael and the Chardonnays she's produced for her own label (Marcassin) and others, she has the Pinot noir bug as bad as anyone.