March hare


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March hare

n.
A hare in breeding season, when it typically engages in aggressive behavior.

[So called because hares were traditionally said to engage in such behavior in the month of March.]

March hare

n
(Animals) a hare during its breeding season in March, noted for its wild and excitable behaviour (esp in the phrase mad as a March hare)
References in classic literature ?
`lives a March Hare. Visit either you like: they're both mad.'
Alice waited a little, half expecting to see it again, but it did not appear, and after a minute or two she walked on in the direction in which the March Hare was said to live.
She had not gone much farther before she came in sight of the house of the March Hare: she thought it must be the right house, because the chimneys were shaped like ears and the roof was thatched with fur.
I was as mad as a March hare, and after that I got only madder.
I am very fond of them, though I often have to be scolding them; they are all as silly and mad as march hares."
Traditionalist Margaret Dove, 80, has pulled countless pints at The March Hare since she and late husband George opened it in 1958.
March Hare Salon (www.marchharesaloncarmel.com) is one of the oldest hair salons in the world-class destination, Carmel-by-the-Sea, Calif.
Seat 1 2 3 4 5 Name Seat color Seat type Cup Ingredient Seat 1 2 3 4 5 Name Time Alice Mad Hatter Dormouse March Hare Seat color Yellow Blue Red Green White Seat type Bean bag Armchair Bench Highchair Stool Cup Mug Chalice Bowl Thermos Teacup Ingredient Cakes Sugar Tea Treacle Cream Laura White
It is now time to say good-bye to this month, which started off when people began 'to swerve and to stare, and be as brainless as a March hare' aiding and abetting the madness which is now waning, as the last vestiges of March now blends into the foolishness of the April month, which has been best described by David Lehman as the month where there is 'too much thesis, too little antithesis, too many novels, too few poems,
The centuries-old expression to describe someone as 'mad as a March hare', is derived from the long-eared mammal's frenzied behaviour, so often witnessed at this time of year in the fields, moors and farms of the British countryside.
As mad as a March hare THE Old Bailey was told that John Reginald Christie was "as mad as a March hare" at the time he murdered his wife Ethel and six other women at 10 Rillington Place.
THE King's Academy's Spring Festival and craft fair - being held today - will have an Alice in Wonderland theme with the chance to take tea with Alice, the Mad Hatter and the March Hare, play crazy golf with the Queen of Hearts and go on an egg hunt with the White Rabbit.