Marches


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Related to Marches: marchesa, Welsh Marches

Mar·ches

 (mär′chĭz)
See Marche2.

Marches

(ˈmɑːtʃɪz)
n
1. (Placename) the border area between England and Wales or Scotland, both characterized by continual feuding (13th–16th centuries)
2. (Placename) a region of central Italy. Capital: Ancona. Pop: 1 484 601 (2003 est). Area: 9692 sq km (3780 sq miles). Italian name: Le Marche
3. (Placename) any of various other border regions

March•es

(ˈmɑr tʃɪz)

n.pl. the,
1. the border districts between England and Scotland or England and Wales.
2. Italian, Le Mar•che (lɛ ˈmɑr kɛ) a region in central Italy on the Adriatic. 1,438,000; 3743 sq. mi. (9695 sq. km).
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.Marches - a region in central ItalyMarches - a region in central Italy    
Italia, Italian Republic, Italy - a republic in southern Europe on the Italian Peninsula; was the core of the Roman Republic and the Roman Empire between the 4th century BC and the 5th century AD

marches

plural noun borders, limits, boundaries, confines, frontiers, borderland, marchlands the Welsh marches, forming our border with England
References in classic literature ?
It was a cheerful, hopeful letter, full of lively descriptions of camp life, marches, and military news, and only at the end did the writer's heart over-flow with fatherly love and longing for the little girls at home.
Years passed away before the traditionary tale of the white maiden, and of the young warrior of the Mohicans ceased to beguile the long nights and tedious marches, or to animate their youthful and brave with a desire for vengeance.
It had its drawbacks; such as hunger and thirst, inclement weather, hot sunshine, and weary and foot-blistering marches over barren and ugly tracts, that lay between the sites desirable for their fertility and beauty.
This body of soldiery -- which still sustains a corporate existence, and marches down from past ages with an ancient and honourable fame -- was composed of no mercenary materials.
Not to seem ignorant about the thing --though in truth he was entirely so, concerning the precise way in which to manage the barrow --Queequeg puts his chest upon it; lashes it fast; and then shoulders the barrow and marches up the wharf.
The slanting light of the setting sun quivers on the sea-like expanse of the river; the shivery canes, and the tall, dark cypress, hung with wreaths of dark, funereal moss, glow in the golden ray, as the heavily-laden steamboat marches onward.