Marduk


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Related to Marduk: Tiamat

Mar·duk

 (mär′do͝ok)
n. Mythology
The chief Babylonian god.

[Akkadian.]

Marduk

(ˈmɑːdʊk)
n
(Other Non-Christian Religions) the chief god of the Babylonian pantheon
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.Marduk - the chief Babylonian godMarduk - the chief Babylonian god; his consort was Sarpanitu
Babylon - the chief city of ancient Mesopotamia and capital of the ancient kingdom of Babylonia
References in periodicals archive ?
At the most, the place of the Sumerian god Anu was given to Marduk, or Utu became Shamash, otherwise there was no fundamental change in the old rituals and customs and way of life; and it was indeed not possible for a change to happen because transformations in the way of life and style of thought of a society happen when the existence of that society decrees those transformations; and the existence of society indeed demands transformations when the old relations of production begin to become a hurdle in the path of societal progress.
When standing it consisted of a number of successive platforms one on top of another, each smaller than the one below, a sanctuary to Marduk on the top.'' (Marduk was the principal god of the Babylonians.
Lambert (1986) first acknowledged that Enuma elis borrows elements from Anzu to depict Marduk as the new Ninurta, the implications of which were highlighted by Machinist: "The similarities with and modifications of the Anzu text...
For instance, among the myths of Mesopotamia, when the gods want to challenge the strength of their son, Marduk, they ask him to destroy and recreate one of the constellations by the power of his speech.
When gay angsty teen Johnny and his goth best friend, trans girl Alison, perform a vengeance spell against a group of bullies, they suddenly find themselves whisked away to the Marduk Institute, a school for wayward wizards.
More importantly, Nabonidus's religious reforms came up against the various entrenched traditional priesthoods, such as those of Ishtar, Samas (also spelled Shamash in English), Nabu, and especially that of Marduk. (7)
01446 738622 MUSIC Marduk Black metal from Sweden with support from Norway's Ragnarok.
Then he takes up the divine hate that the Hebrew Bible attributes to Yahweh and other sources attribute to members of the Canaanite and Mesopotamian pantheons such as Baal, Marduk, and Enlil.
Murduk, on the other hand, is not an Indian name but is almost certainly a reference to the god more commonly known as "Marduk" of ancient Mesopotamia, the patron deity of the city of Babylon, dating back to the eighteenth century BC.20 It is not clear why Wiechert changed the spelling of the god's name but it may have been his desire through a simple camouflaged linguistic corruption to associate the king as Hitler cipher with the virtual leitmotiv of the novella "Morder," which is repeatedly used to designate tigers and crocodiles, even if "duk" as a corruption of the Italian duce is less certain (cf.
Reverend Jonathan Marduk Rico, spokesman for Scientology, declared that the culture of drug prevention and a drug free life is typical of all Scientologists, and said: "Scientologists are a community hundred percent drug-free.
(Babylonians saw Jupiter as the celestial form of their patron god, Marduk.) Until now, credit for this kind of advanced math technique had gone to 14th-century European scholars.