Marfan syndrome

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Mar·fan syndrome

 (mär′făn)
n.
A genetic disorder principally affecting the connective tissues of the body, manifested in varying degrees by excessive bone elongation and joint flexibility and by abnormalities of the eye and cardiovascular system.

[After Antonin Bernard Jean Marfan (1858-1942), French pediatrician.]
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

Marfan syndrome

(ˈmɑːfæn)
n
(Pathology) a disorder of connective tissue that is characterized by abnormal elongation of the bones and often by visual impairment
[C19: named after Antoine Marfan (1858–1942), French paediatrician]
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

Mar′fan syn`drome

(ˈmɑr fæn, mɑrˈfæn)

n.
a hereditary disorder characterized by abnormally elongated bones, hypermotility of the joints, and circulatory and eye abnormalities.
[after Antonin Bernard Marfan (1858–1942), French pediatrician, who described it in 1892]
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.
References in periodicals archive ?
The authors of the editorial concluded that Marfan syndrome patients without previous cardiac complications and who have a baseline aortic root diameter not in excess of 45 mm seem to tolerate pregnancy well as long as they receive good clinical care before, during, and after pregnancy.
Following aortic valve replacement and mitral valve repair, a 16-year-old female with Marfan's syndrome had a hypertensive crisis while under monitoring in the intensive care unit.
Other causes of aortic aneurysm include aortic dissection, Marfan syndrome, congenital medial degeneration, bicuspid aortic valve, coarctation, Ehlers-Danlos syndrome, Loeys-Dietz syndrome, syphilis and other infections, arteritis, or trauma.
The fifth annual Cannonbawz Run, which raises funds for the Marfan Association and Scotland's Air Charity Ambulance, was packed with unusual sights.
The Cannonbawz Run was created by Lossiemouth-based air ambulance paramedic Kris O'Neill to raise funds for the Marfan Trust medical research charity and Scotland's Charity Air Ambulance (SCAA).
These include patients with peripheral arterial or vascular disease, hypertension, genetic conditions such as Ehlers-Danlos or Marfan syndrome and the elderly.
The girls, from Wrexham, both suffer from Marfan Syndrome, a genetic abnormality with the connective tissue, which holds all the body's cells, organs and tissues together and help the body to develop.
Memorial contributions may be made to the Marfan Foundation at https://www.marfan.org/.
Steffanie, said: "We only found out around four weeks ago from Bradford Coroner's Office following a post-mortem examination what she had died from, we weren't even aware she had Marfan syndrome.
Kris's younger brother Liam has a rare genetic disease called Marfan syndrome and Kris is raising cash for the Marfan Association.