Newman

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New·man

 (no͞o′mən, nyo͞o′-), Alfred 1900-1970.
American composer of more than 200 film scores, including Academy Award-winning adaptations of the musicals The King and I (1956) and Camelot (1967).

New·man

 (no͞o′mən, nyo͞o′-), John Henry 1801-1890.
British prelate and theologian. A founder of the Oxford Movement, he converted to Roman Catholicism (1845) and was made a cardinal (1879).

Newman

, Paul Leonard 1925-2008.
American actor and director who starred in such films as Cool Hand Luke (1967), The Sting (1973), and The Color of Money (1986), for which he won an Academy Award.

Newman

(ˈnjuːmən)
n
1. (Biography) Barnet. 1905–70, US painter, a founder of Abstract Expressionism: his paintings include the series Stations of the Cross (1965–66)
2. (Biography) John Henry. 1801–90, British theologian and writer. Originally an Anglican minister, he was a prominent figure in the Oxford Movement. He became a Roman Catholic (1845) and a priest (1847) and was made a cardinal (1879). His writings include the spiritual autobiography Apologia pro vita sua (1864), a treatise on the nature of belief, The Grammar of Assent (1870), and hymns
3. (Biography) Paul. 1925–2008, US film actor and director, who appeared in such films as Hud (1963), Butch Cassidy and the Sundance Kid (1969), The Sting (1973), The Verdict (1982), The Color of Money (1986), Nobody's Fool (1994), and Road to Perdition (2002)

New•man

(ˈnu mən, ˈnyu-)

n.
John Henry, Cardinal, 1801–90, English theologian and author.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.Newman - United States film actor (born in 1925)
2.Newman - English prelate and theologian who (with John Keble and Edward Pusey) founded the Oxford movementNewman - English prelate and theologian who (with John Keble and Edward Pusey) founded the Oxford movement; Newman later turned to Roman Catholicism and became a cardinal (1801-1890)
Translations
Novak
Nyman
NeumannNaumann
Nýman
Neander
Nijman, Nyman
Nyman
Novak
Nyman