Bourke-White

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Bourke-White

(bûrk′wīt′, -hwīt′), Margaret 1906-1971.
American photographer and writer. During her career at Life magazine (1936-1969), she photographed such diverse subjects as the rural South, Soviet life, and the release of concentration camp victims.

Bourke-White

(ˌbɜːkˈwaɪt)
n
(Biography) Margaret. 1906–71, US photographer, a pioneer of modern photojournalism: noted esp for her coverage of World War II

Bourke-White

(ˈbɜrkˈʰwaɪt, -ˈwaɪt)

n.
Margaret, 1906–71, U.S. photographer and author.
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One in particular is Margaret Bourke-White, a photographer who, according to Freeman, "did more than any other to disseminate images of giant industry" (149).
Margaret Bourke-White was born in 1904, in the Bronx, New York.
"We have great conviction that her work should be seen in the context of other influential artists such as Edward Weston, Ansel Adams, Man Ray and Margaret Bourke-White. Additionally, Iturbide's strong images will complement other recent acquisitions and displays of work which explore how cultures intersect and transcendborders."<br />Iturbide's photographs tell a visual story of Mexico since the late 1970sa country in constant transition, defined by the coexistence of the historical and modern as a result of the culture's rich syncretism.
Margaret Bourke-White, free from the ethical dilemmas of the FSA, cuts a striking figure here, flashing away without compunction.
Stone among them); its stellar news photographers (briefly Margaret Bourke-White and especially Weegee, along with others, like Morris Engel and Helen Levitt, associated with the New York Photo League); its regular columnist Dr.
The resulting photos of Gandhi's last day of life and the events surrounding his funeral helped catapult Cartier-Bresson to international fame when they were published in life, eclipsing those of the American photojournalist Margaret Bourke-White who was there officially representing the magazine.
Margaret Bourke-White and the Dawn of Apartheid (Indiana: Indiana University Press, 2016, pp.
In the spring of 1942, the War Department reluctantly bent its rule, allowing Life magazine photojournalist Margaret Bourke-White to become the first accredited female war correspondent to cover combat, largely due to her acclaimed photos of the Moscow Kremlin being bombed by the Germans in 1941.
There are bikers in California and burlesque dancers (1936) surprisingly captured by legendary photo-journalist Margaret Bourke-White, who worked for Life magazine (shooting their first cover) for many years documenting the 20th century.
The fact that the striking cover image of Margaret Bourke-White was taken by a man (Oscar Graubner) could spark a conversation or two, and perhaps that's a good thing.
Barely a month after independence, Jinnah was self-confidently boasting before Margaret Bourke-White, an American journalist, that, America needs Pakistan more than Pakistan needs America." In the Cold War context this assumption proved correct.
Profiles of such giants of the past as Matthew Brady, Sebastian Salgado, Margaret Bourke-White, and Alfred Stieglitz particularize developments in diagonal thrust, chiaroscuro, and the use of platinotype.