Kempe

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Kempe

(kɛmp)
n
1. (Biography) Margery. ?1373–?1440, English mystic. Her autobiography, The Book of Margery Kempe, describes her mystical experiences and pilgrimages in Europe and Palestine
2. (Biography) Rudolf (ˈruːdɔlf). 1910–76, German orchestral conductor, noted esp for his interpretations of Wagner
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It presents autobiographical writing by mothers addressing Christian spirituality, profiling the lives and ideas of nine women from medieval times to the present, including Margery Kempe, Jane de Chantal, and Lena Frances Edwards.
One misses the Reformers, the Wesleys, women in addition to Margery Kempe, Eastern Orthodoxy, or anyone outside a Euro-American context.
Margery Kempe came to visit Julian around 1414 and speaks of her as an expert who gave good counsel.
As Margery Kempe, Henry Benjamin Whipple, and Dietrich Bonhoeffer saw it, silence in the face of evil was just plain wrong None of them has been declared a saint.
Once she got started on Margery Kempe or Jane Austen, contest was in vain.
In it Dinshaw explores the asynchrony of Hope Emily Allen, the amateur whose work with medieval texts brought The Book of Margery Kempe into the twentieth century.
Norfolk has nurtured a remarkable succession of communicative female contemplatives, from Margery Kempe and Julian of Norwich (represented by the Berger Crucifixion) to Sister Wendy Beckett (in her 2012 Christmas documentary).
Hsy writes of the distinguished (John Gower, Margery Kempe, William Caxton) as well as the obscure as he analyzes the ever-changing nature of the ways of writing, focusing on London's languages and translingual writing, Chaucer's polyglot existence at home and at the customs house, overseas travels and languages in motion, translingual identities in John Gower and William Caxton, travel and language contacts in The Book of Margery Kemp, merchant compilations and translingual creation, and contact literatures, both medieval and postcolonial.
After being pestered by devils for more than six months, Margery Kempe - new mother, mayor's daughter and proprietress of a highly profitable beer business - is liberated from her torment by a vision of Jesus Christ, in this play by University of Oregon alumna Heidi Schreck.
of Margery Kempe is not the text people immediately think of when they
Tamas Karath's essay, the last in this section, focuses on the 15th-century Book of Margery Kempe, the first acknowledged autobiography in English literature.
Margery Kempe went to Julian for a consultation about her own visionary experiences in the same year Julian wrote down the earlier text of her visions, which Margery is unlikely to have been able to read.