Kempe

(redirected from Margery Kempe)
Also found in: Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.

Kempe

(kɛmp)
n
1. (Biography) Margery. ?1373–?1440, English mystic. Her autobiography, The Book of Margery Kempe, describes her mystical experiences and pilgrimages in Europe and Palestine
2. (Biography) Rudolf (ˈruːdɔlf). 1910–76, German orchestral conductor, noted esp for his interpretations of Wagner
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014
Mentioned in ?
References in periodicals archive ?
Riehle has been publishing on medieval English mysticism for many decades, and in The Secret Within he engages not only with a wealth of scholars' views from both English- and German-language scholarship (often in the rich and detailed endnotes), but also with his own earlier assessments (for example, in his view that his earlier research had dismissed Margery Kempe too quickly).
Sidhu next turns to the The Book of Margery Kempe and posits that Margery's use of obscene comedy, especially the unruly woman, is more intentional and self-conscious than has been previously acknowledged.
It presents autobiographical writing by mothers addressing Christian spirituality, profiling the lives and ideas of nine women from medieval times to the present, including Margery Kempe, Jane de Chantal, and Lena Frances Edwards.
Alexandra Verini addresses models of female friendship in the European Middle Ages, arguing that Christine de Pizan and Margery Kempe illustrate a "viable female alternative" to classical models.
One misses the Reformers, the Wesleys, women in addition to Margery Kempe, Eastern Orthodoxy, or anyone outside a Euro-American context.
Margery Kempe came to visit Julian around 1414 and speaks of her as an expert who gave good counsel.
As Margery Kempe, Henry Benjamin Whipple, and Dietrich Bonhoeffer saw it, silence in the face of evil was just plain wrong None of them has been declared a saint.
In it Dinshaw explores the asynchrony of Hope Emily Allen, the amateur whose work with medieval texts brought The Book of Margery Kempe into the twentieth century.
Norfolk has nurtured a remarkable succession of communicative female contemplatives, from Margery Kempe and Julian of Norwich (represented by the Berger Crucifixion) to Sister Wendy Beckett (in her 2012 Christmas documentary).
Hsy writes of the distinguished (John Gower, Margery Kempe, William Caxton) as well as the obscure as he analyzes the ever-changing nature of the ways of writing, focusing on London's languages and translingual writing, Chaucer's polyglot existence at home and at the customs house, overseas travels and languages in motion, translingual identities in John Gower and William Caxton, travel and language contacts in The Book of Margery Kemp, merchant compilations and translingual creation, and contact literatures, both medieval and postcolonial.
The story is based generally on the life of Margery Kempe, a mystic and writer in medieval England.
early modern incarnations of The Book of Margery Kempe: A Shorte