marginalism

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marginalism

(ˈmɑːdʒɪnəˌlɪzəm)
n
(Economics) the economic theory that the value to the final user is the true value of the product
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From a more methodologically point of view: various approaches to priority setting contain important elements of evidence-informed deliberative processes, including A4R, (10) multi-criteria decision analysis (MCDA) (28) and programme budgeting and marginal analysis (PBMA).
Gross returns, net field benefits, net returns, benefit cost ratio, dominance and marginal analysis (CIMMYT, 1988) were used to determine the profitability of different foliar FeSO4 treatments.
These guidelines can be applied to assess a selection of priority setting frameworks such as Program Budgeting and Marginal Analysis (PBMA), Multi-Criteria Decision Analysis (MCDA) or the Quality-Adjusted Life Years (QALYs) for suitability for use in the Indigenous health sector.
Instead, the marginal analysis defines the tradeoff space, but not the solution, for the decision makers.
Marginal analysis has long been a mainstay of managerial accounting theory and practice.
Marginal Analysis as a Mechanism to Assess Regulatory Scaling
However marginal analysis revealed that only the herbicide treatments were economical due to higher marginal rate of return while other were dominated to the cost of vary.
Economic analysis is the basic consideration in determining which treatment gives the highest return while marginal analysis indicates the relative contribution of additional expenditures.
We may excuse Bastiat; after all, marginal analysis was not part of the general body of economic knowledge in his time.
Marginal analysis is one of such techniques which can assist research workers in decision making.
This framework should support the commander's decision regarding the adjustment/tuning of the portfolio so as to fill the gaps, balance risks/ opportunities, prioritize by groups rather than by discrete activities, and even to conduct investment analysis, such as marginal or chunky marginal analysis.