marginalism

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marginalism

(ˈmɑːdʒɪnəˌlɪzəm)
n
(Economics) the economic theory that the value to the final user is the true value of the product
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Eventually the marginal benefit of upgrading will be greater than that of your current situation and that's when you switch.
(10) Our two-period model of self-protection is very different in that only the marginal benefit is affected by the introduction of the second risk, which explains the different result.
Thus, the level of reserves at which the marginal cost of holding an additional dollar of reserves equals the marginal benefit of doing so is much higher now than it was before the financial crisis.
Table 1: Example of the business principle of profit maximization once marginal benefit equals marginal costs.
Their stock markets have become casinos where chips are bought and sold largely by foreign investors, with marginal benefit to the domestic economy.
To the extent that additional compliance costs (in both money and time) outweigh the marginal benefit to be gained from charging advisory fees, then agents and brokers may believe it preferable to retain an insurance-focused practice -- even if means lost business for non-product-related services they could be rendering.
marginal benefit) and the cost of that regulation (i.e., its marginal
The left-hand and right-hand side expressions, respectively, indicate the marginal benefit and marginal cost facing the Organization.
An STS is superior to a regulatory approach under the assumptions of a relatively flat social marginal benefit curve, uncertainty about the costs and benefits of pollution reduction, as well as the capacity to make the transition to a green economy.
Several bread-and-butter screening procedures and tests promoted for years have been debunked as having no value (routine testicular exam and monthly self-breast exam), having harms that might outweigh the benefits (PSA for prostate cancer), or having marginal benefit for those in certain age groups (mammography in women younger than 50).
However, I see this more as an idea looking for a problem to solve, when it will only introduce additional issues for a marginal benefit.
Kenneth Gonzalez said: “There is a growing realization amongst organizations that re-engineering processes, creating policies and practices, giving employees new knowledge and adopting new frameworks or technologies only provides marginal benefit if not done as part of an intentional shift towards a new way of doing business.