tax rate

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tax rate

n
(Economics) the percentage of income, wealth, etc, assessed as payable in taxation
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.tax rate - rate used to calculate tax liability
charge per unit, rate - amount of a charge or payment relative to some basis; "a 10-minute phone call at that rate would cost $5"
References in periodicals archive ?
With existing programs, the marginal effective tax rate has been calculated to be high already for many families.
Accordingly the higher the marginal effective tax rate, the weaker the financial incentive to progress.
If provincial governments eliminated these taxes and harmonized their sales taxes with the GST, Canada would actually have the lowest marginal effective tax rate among G7 nations."
A marginal effective tax rate is determined by a discounted cash flow analysis, where the internal rate of return with and without taxes is compared.
High marginal effective tax rates are an inevitable side-effect of any income-tested benefit and there is a trade-off between work incentives and the fiscal cost of income support.
Income taxes and current welfare benefits are the component that contributes most to the marginal effective tax rate. The weighted average of this component is 44.0 percent, of which income taxes account for 43.3 percentage points (see Table 33).
At the same time, traditional measures of marginal effective tax rates (King 1977; King and Fullerton 1984) often are much more precise but are not tractable for constructing a long time series of tax rates over several countries, as required for this analysis.
If an SSR's earned income exceeds the annual earnings limit, there may be a substantial increase in the marginal effective tax rate. The severity of the effect depends primarily on whether (1) the taxpayer has been subject to a full phase-in of includible Social Security benefits, (2) the taxpayer is under age 65 and (3) the earnings are self-employment (SE) income.
More recent research on the incentive effects of taxation has focused on the "marginal effective tax rate," which measures the extra tax resulting from a hypothetical marginal investment by a firm in a given industry.
The marginal effective tax rate determines the work choice at the intensive margin: for the single worker, how many hours to put in; for the family unit, whether secondary earners should work and, if so, whether part or full time; for low-income or disabled people, whether to work rather than collect benefits; and for people eligible for retirement, how soon to withdraw.
If provincial governments eliminated these taxes and harmonized their sales taxes with the GST, Canada would actually have the lowest marginal effective tax rate among G7 nations." Tax Executives Institute has long supported elimination of capital taxes and the harmonization of the provincial and federal sales tax systems.
We have considered three fiscal policy variables: [MARTAX.sub.it], the marginal effective tax rate estimated as described in section II; [AT.sub.it], the ratio of total revenues to GDP; and [GCONS.sub.it], the growth of the share of government consumption on total government expenditures.