tax rate

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tax rate

n
(Economics) the percentage of income, wealth, etc, assessed as payable in taxation
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.tax rate - rate used to calculate tax liability
charge per unit, rate - amount of a charge or payment relative to some basis; "a 10-minute phone call at that rate would cost $5"
References in periodicals archive ?
With her suggestion of raising the marginal tax rate on income over $10 million to 70 percent, Rep.
Therefore, we opted to follow a more comprehensive indicator, namely the effective marginal tax rate. The effective marginal tax rate is an indicator that reflects the income and payroll tax burden on the working population and interacts with benefit schemes at the same time.
Because of the decline in the top corporate income tax rate and the marginal tax rate on pass-through income, the value of the interest paid deduction falls, increasing the METR on debt-financed investments for both corporate and noncorporate entities.
Highest tax rate is the highest marginal tax rate. Lowest tax rate is the lowest marginal tax rate.
"One key 'rule of thumb' to consider is your marginal tax rate today and your expected marginal tax rate in retirement, including the possible clawback of government benefits.
Inherent in this definition of an income-based cliff effect is the existence of, for at least some portion of the additional income, a marginal tax rate greater than 100%.
The organisation's remarks come as Government sources revealed the marginal tax rate would be reduced to 49.5%, and the Universal Social Charge will be axed by 2020.
Stabile (2004) uses Canadian micro-level data for the period 1990-1996 and finds that a higher marginal tax rate has a negative effect on the decision to be self-employed.
In terms of the income marginal tax rate, a number of countries, i.e., Albania and the FYROM, applied the flat version of this tax.
This article is not intended to repeat that excellent summary, but to provide the results of a sensitivity analysis' of the benefits of the two methods for taking the home office deduction across a range of three variables: the square footage of the home office, the total cost of the residence, and the marginal tax rate. An Excel spreadsheet, available at tinyurl.com/nqcd5pq, illustrates this analysis.
However, he only asks whether the growth rate of real per capita GDP was different in years in which the top marginal tax rate changed.
For individuals with an ordinary marginal tax rate of 15% or less, the capital gains tax rate was 0%, whereas individuals with a marginal tax rate above 15% were subject to a capital gains tax rate of 15%.