marginalist


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marginalist

(ˈmɑːdʒɪnəlɪst)
n
(Economics) somene who adheres to the theory of marginalism
adj
(Economics) of or relating to marginalism
References in periodicals archive ?
The marginalist revolution has removed not just a set of tools to discuss this major change critically, but it has removed it as even a question worth exploring.
"To What Extent Was the Austrian School Marginalist?," History of Political Economy 4, no.
Think of Marshall's (1890) marginalist analysis, in which he develops a conceptual apparatus around wages and work conditions.
"Martin Sonneborn, an MEP, head of a political party consisting of one person, a political jester and marginalist, is one of such clowns," Hajiyev said.
For the express appeal to marginalist concepts in this context, see also Yellowbear v.
These aspects come from the contributions of the school of Physiocracy, the Classical school of political economy and the Marginalist school (Blaug 2003; Ward 1972: 40-41).
The marginalist revolution separated value theory in two specters: the objective theory of value and the subjective theory of value.
It demonstrates no understanding that Weber's sociology was a complement --not an alternative--to the marginalist economics of his day (an ancestor of the neoliberal ideology that today legitimates and encourages harm on a wide scale in spite of what many critics see as its intellectual bankruptcy).
This theory of wages contradicted the neoclassical theory of marginal productivity developed by John Bates Clark in the late 1880s as part of the marginalist revolution in economics.
Unlike products that contain labour components in their value, the land component within real property has no cost of production, which means that its supply function cannot be constructed from marginalist supply theory (Jones, 1976).
(5) Cournot's analysis of profit maximization was extended to utility maximization with the Marginalist revolution of Jevons, Menger, and Walras.