Yourcenar

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Yourcenar

(ˈjʊkənɑː)
n
(Biography) Marguerite, original name Marguerite de Crayencour. 1903–87, French novelist and writer, in the US from 1939; noted for her historical novels, esp Mémoires d'Hadrien (1952)
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

Your•ce•nar

(ˈyʊər səˌnɑr)
n.
Marguerite (de Crayencour) 1903–87, French poet and novelist, born in Belgium.
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.
References in periodicals archive ?
We Met in Paris: Grace Frick and Her Life with Marguerite Yourcenar by Joan E.
Grace Frick introduced English-language readers all over the world to the distinguished French author Marguerite Yourcenar with her award-winning translation of Yourcenar's novel "Memoirs of Hadrian" in 1954.
"We Met in Paris": Grace Frick and Her Life with Marguerite Yourcenar
Rampling will be part of the performance dedicated to Greek poet Constantinos Cavafy and French novelist Marguerite Yourcenar and will recite Cavafy's poetry in French.
An ancient mosaic in Pompeii stirs him to remember Keats; Tuscany evokes Michelangelo, Shakespeare, Rothko, Masaccio, and, more intriguingly, a haiku by Issa; and in the final essay, Donovan gathers together Caravaggio, Dante, George Herbert, Marguerite Yourcenar, Brueghel, Walter Benjamin, the Psalms, Pope Alexander VII, Mussolini, and Elizabeth Bishop.
Marguerite Yourcenar (1903-1987), born in Belgium to a French father and a Belgian mother, wrote in French but lived for more than half of her life in the United States.
Through the intersection of appropriated image and text from various mythological and modern sources (as well as embroidered copies of classical renderings of Greek myths), the work on view intervened in these interpretations by suffusing them with alternate readings by a wide range of twentieth-century cultural producers from across Western Europe: stage and silent-film actress Sarah Bernhardt, modernist painters Giorgio de Chirico and Andre Masson, poet Stevie Smith, and novelist Marguerite Yourcenar. The show was characterized by the artist's deft appropriations--a line here, an image there--from the vast repertoire of modernist art, literature, and theater.
'<< En faveur de l'exact et du nu >>: Memoires d'Hadrien dans la correspondance de Marguerite Yourcenar,' in B.