Marguerite de Valois


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Related to Marguerite de Valois: Charles IX, Catherine de Medici

Marguerite de Valois

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The royal wives and mistresses that Wellman analyzes (Agnes Sorel, Anne of Brittany, Diane de Poitiers, Catherine de Medici, Marguerite de Valois, and Gabrielle d'Estrees) all influenced public policies and perceptions of the monarchy as well as the monarch himself.
As exemplified by the publication history of the English translations of the memoirs of Marguerite de Valois, altered titles, title pages, printer's marks, and dedicatory epistles point to what Prescott views as the crux of'early modern mythologizing' and 'paratextual transmutation' (p.
Anne Lake Prescott considers women's presentation as writers in their printed texts, tracing changing contextualisation of Marguerite de Valois's memoirs across the political regimes of seventeenth-century England, always framing her significance in relation to leading men.
It was a pleasure, too, to hear soprano Raphaelle Paquette bring her bright tone and lovely legato to the role of Marguerite de Valois. She gave a fine account of the difficult "O beau pays de Tourrainc" though did have some intonation problems later when she pushed too hard at the top.
Jeanne d'Albret died in 1572 and a new queen of Navarre, Marguerite de Valois, succeeded her.
The passion for the picturesque and the interest in a more detailed historical knowledge not only anticipate Romantic drama, argue the volume's editors, they also attest to the fraught construction of a collective national memory, as playwrights resurrect such celebrated figures as Henri IV and Marguerite de Valois both to legitimize and to contest different political regimes throughout the volatile period.
Eliane Viennot's recent book Marguerite de Valois: "La reine Margo" (2005) explores both the life and the myth of that queen.
In addition to her own salon, l'Aubespine was also an important participant in three leading literary circles: the court of Marguerite de Valois, the salon vert of Catherine de Clairemont, the marechale de Retz, and the Academie du Palais of Henry III, who favored l'Aubespine so much that he gave her an abbey (1582), to the consternation of Rome (L'Aubespine, 20).
For the Paris entries of Charles IX and Elisabeth of Austria in 1571, Catherine de' Medici was represented as Pallas on a fountain; Catherine's daughter, Marguerite de Valois, was associated with the goddess; and Elisabeth of Austria was associated with Minerva in a series of allegorical sugar confectioneries served up at the 'collation de la royne' (Victor E.
Margaret, of Valoisalso called Margaret of France or Queen Margot French Marguerite de Valois, or de France, or Reine Margot (b.
(also known as Marguerite de Navarre, Marguerite de Valois, and Marguerite d'Angouleme; 1492 - 1549) French queen and author.
Olsen's textual history study of the poetic miscellany, Le tombeau de Marguerite de Valois, reveals the link between the literary and political communities therein created; Jane Couchman's essay on Louise de Coligny's little-known album in the Koninklijke Biblioteek offers a perceptive glimpse of the shifts in poetic taste during the compilation period, 1570s to early 1600s.