Marianism


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Related to Marianism: Marianismo, Mariology

Marianism

Rare. a religious cult based on the veneration of the Virgin Mary.
See also: Catholicism
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In Brazil, as in other Latin American countries, marianism reinforces this maternal authority as it positions women as morally superior to men by virtue of their emulation of the selfless, nurturing characteristics associated with the Virgin Mary.
Among those who touch on the subject, Elisabeth Daumer sets the poet's Marianism in the psychological context of his relationship with his mother and finds this sufficient explanation.
Specific topics include rethinking Vietnamese women's property rights and the role of ancestor worship in premodern society: beyond the dichotomies, divorce prevalence under the forces of individualism and collectivism in "shortcut" modernity in Vietnam, living in intimacy: a case study of women's community at a Caodaist temple in Hanoi, and Marianism in the transnational public sphere between Vietnamese Catholics in the US and Vietnam.
As Chesterton himself notes, the Marian title often used by Anglicans--namely, "the Madonna'--quite literally and incongruously means "the my Lady:' GKC'S high regard for the Holy Virgin was not prompted by pious longing for motherly comfort--the usual canard about "sentimental Marianism:' It sprang, instead, from his estimate of her as the Theotokos, the God-bearing mother of Jesus who is also mother of his Body called the Church.
A hodgepodge of loosely interpreted (and often strangely repeated) sources fails to provide a sense of how cultural Catholics themselves think about rites of passage, processions, Marianism, or the language and experience of family.
New definitions of gender, freed of marianismo (Marianism) and machismo, emerge in the film.
The themes of sacrifice, death, and burial become especially relevant in connecting Latina artists to a long-standing tradition in Latin Catholicism: Marianism. The concept of woman as self-sacrificing martyr is idealized in Latin cultures as the complement to male machismo.
She examines the most important features of religious life as practiced in local communities, namely the parish and its temple, ecclesial chapels, the celebration of sacred time through feasts, the veneration of icons, and Marianism in its Orthodox context.
By combining elements of Catholic Marianism and strict-father Protestantism, Gibson created an icon for this communion at the ballot box.
But that clerical, conventual Segovia, Marianism apart, is more a case of wishful thinking than a reflection of social reality.
While the focus is appropriately on the Christian foundations of most millenarian thinking, this book is unique in its identification of movements that run parallel with Christianity or include Christian elements, such as Post-Reformation Marianism and Unitarianism, the nineteenth-century T'aiping rebellion, and more recently, Aum in Japan.
Marianism is thus an ideal focus for Rey s neo-Marxist study.