Marie de France


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Marie de France

(French mari də frɑ̃s)
n
(Biography) 12th century ad, French poet, who probably lived in England; noted for her lais (verse narratives) based on Celtic tales
References in periodicals archive ?
Fitz, "The `Prologue' of Marie de France and the Parable of the Talents: Gloss and Monetary Metaphor" MLN 90 (1975) 558-64 and Leupin, "The Impossible Task."
Marie de France posits as well that caritas, the love exhibited by her final three lovers in the Lais, lies at the opposite end of the spectrum from her starting point of envy.
Pensons ici au celebre "Bisclavret" de Marie de France dans lequel le heros se transforme en loup-garou.
Sections on Norman forest law, on literary responses to the death of William Rufus and on forest imagery in the lais of Marie de France all contain fascinating and thoughtful insights.Yet while, in the case of Marie's lais, the section offers new readings of familiar texts, it is not entirely clear how these are intended to inform the volume's overarching theme.
Abstract: This paper argues that Marie de France's story "Bisclavret" presents a feminist interpretation of gender expectations and represents a landmark work in feminist critical theory.
Of the twelve lais attributed to Marie de France found in the Harley 978 manuscript, some form of the word merveille, appears in eleven of them.
The moment of surprise and wonder for his junior colleague would come after the candidate had offered a few observations about, say, one of the lais of Marie de France. Ross's face would light up and he'd tell the student that her remarks were all the more interesting in light of such-and-such episodes and narrative features in two or three of her other poems.
In contrast with the civility of the werewolf's French counterpart typified by Marie de France's late twelfth- century "Le Lai de Bisclavret," the French-Canadian loup-garou was a malevolent, destructive creature who could nonetheless be "cured"--converted back to full humanity--with surprising ease.
"Quand l'homme se fait animal, deux cas de metamorphose chez Marie de France: Yonec et Bisclavret." In Magie et illusion au Moyen Age, 65-78.
Eleven essays written by Marie de France scholars address various aspects of the 12th-century writer, a woman, and a prominent literary voice in the 12th century who wrote in French and translated Aesop's fables from English, among other achievements.
Wolfborn takes as its source material a twelfth-century story by Marie de France Lai Le Bisclavret, from a collection called Breton Lais.
Monica Brzezinski Potkay, "The Parable of the Sower and Obscurity in the Prologue to Marie de France's Lais"