Marinism


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Marinism

a 17th-century Italian literary style marked by forced antitheses and elaborate metaphors. — Marinist, n.
See also: Literary Style
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(2) The majority of attacks were aimed directly at the followers of the poet Giambattista Marino (1569-1625), the namesake for the school Marinism and the exemplar of Italian Baroque.
Paying attention to details and inventiveness in subject matter and style of the Neapolitan poet, Arnaudo shows how anamorphic images inspired by Arcimboldo offered him new means to produce more prodigious effects of wonder and to promote, even institutionalize, a figurative taste soon to be known as Marinism that was becoming fashionable in the early Seicento,
Arcadia, Academy ofItalian Accademia dell'ArcadiaItalian literary academy that was founded in Rome in 1690 to combat Marinism, the dominant Italian poetic style of the 17th century.
Also, such literary movements as Marinism (see Giambattista Marino ) in Italy, Gongorism in Spain, and euphuism in England were part of the baroque period.
Marinism marinismo also called secentismoA florid, bombastic literary style fashionable in 17th-century Italy marked by extravagant metaphors, far-fetched conceits, hyperbole, fantastic wordplay, original myths, and forced antitheses.
It had counterparts in the Marinism of Italy (see Giambattista Marino ) and the euphuism of England.
Italian poet, founder of the school of Marinism (later secentismo), which dominated 17th-century Italian poetry.
His extension of Petrachan love motifs and his preference for themes from classical Roman mythology are also characteristic of Marinism. In the following centuries, a reaction against Marinism, seen as part of a larger decadence ( secentismo , " 17th - centuryism " ), lowered his reputation to near oblivion.
Preciosity in France was eventually carried to excess and led to exaggeration and affectation (particularly as reflected in burlesque writers), as it did in other countries--seen, for example, in such movements as gongorismo in Spain, Marinism in Italy, and euphuism in England.