mark-to-market


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mark-to-market

adj
accounting denoting a system that values assets according to their current market price
References in periodicals archive ?
This book is a collection of public domain documents (the specific sources of which are not identified) relating to Congressionally-mandated requirements for the study of "mark-to-market" accounting standards and the usefulness of information financial institutions provide the public.
THE ISSUE OF MARK-TO-MARKET ACCOUNTING is a contentious topic at the national level as large financial companies strive to restore order to their balance sheets and seek valuation relief on stressed assets.
On April 9, 2009, the Financial Services Accounting Board (FASB) issued final guidance on two proposals related to mark-to-market accounting, and one associated with accounting for impaired securities, such as mortgage-backed securities.
12 to examine the mark-to-market accounting rules that some contend have exacerbated the current troubles in the financial services industry and in the broader economy.
Credit Union Times asked credit union financial managers their thoughts about the art of accounting and what they think should be done about mark-to-market accounting.
So when he says something like "Mark-to-market accounting is killing this industry," which is what he said on Jan.
Summary: DUBAI - Emirates NBD, the UAEAEs largest bank by assets, said on Thursday its fourth quarter net profit dropped to Dh14 million from Dh1.18 billion in the previous year due to mark-to-market losses and provisions for loan losses.
In a letter to Sir David Tweedie, chairman of the International Accounting Standards Board (IASB), the Commission stated that "in the short term, an urgent need for further guidance in the application of fair value' in illiquid markets was identified, notably on the use of the mark-to-market model".
Critics charge that so-called "mark-to-market" accounting -- also known as fair value accounting -- has forced banks to write down billions of dollars in assets that are considered nearly worthless in a frozen market.
Inflated asset prices would only help to contribute to the S&L (savings and loan) collapse in the US - which inspired the mark-to-market rule - and a decade-long economic slump in Japan in the 1990s.
The company, which announced the mark-to-market writedowns in April, said assets under management fell to pounds 130.2 billion from pounds 139.1 billion at the end of last year.
Most reinsurers say they're just slogging through generally volatile capital markets, a situation made more difficult by mark-to-market accounting that insists on recording unrealized losses to the current quarter.