downturn

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down·turn

 (doun′tûrn′)
n.
A tendency downward, especially in business or economic activity.

downturn

(ˈdaʊnˌtɜːn)
n
(Economics) a drop or reduction in the success of a business or economy

down•turn

(ˈdaʊnˌtɜrn)

n.
1. an act or instance of turning down, or the state of being turned down: the downturn of a lower lip.
2. a downward trend; decline.
[1925–30]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.downturn - a worsening of business or economic activity; "the market took a downturn"
worsening - changing something with the result that it becomes worse
downspin - a swift and dangerous downturn

downturn

noun
A usually swift downward trend, as in prices:
Translations
heikkeneminenlaskulaskusuhdannetaantuma

downturn

[ˈdaʊntɜːn] N (in economy) → deterioro m; (in sales, production) → disminución f

downturn

[ˈdaʊntɜːrn] n (= slump) → récession f
a downturn in → une récession dansdown under adv
(= in Australia) → en Australie
(= in New Zealand) → en Nouvelle-Zélande
References in periodicals archive ?
With its remaining free cash flow, the company intends to repurchase shares on a more consistent basis, with the goal of at least offsetting dilution in market downturns. "Through the execution of our strategy, Caterpillar is now a stronger and more profitable company that can produce higher free cash flow through the cycles," added Umpleby.
The company plans to repurchase shares on a more consistent basis, with the goal of at least offsetting dilution in market downturns.
I would disagree that market downturns are unforeseen, but there should be a will and resolve to manage and mitigate these.
Specifically, a FIA can provide lifetime income, while also offering principal protection from market downturns.
We assume that sponsors will provide liquidity advances if necessary, to support the projects during temporary market downturns due to the strong long-term project economics.
Capital Protection on maturity with a potential for upside through equity exposure Assured Benefit protects savings from market downturns
Allianz's "2013 Transition Boomers and Retirement Income survey" found that 87 percent of transition boomers -- those ages 55 to 65 -- would rather invest in a financial product with a 4 percent return that is guaranteed than one 8 percent return that is subject to losing value due to market downturns. The feeling was higher among women with 91 percent versus 82 percent of men expressing the sentiment.