Marks


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mark 1

 (märk)
n.
1. A visible trace or impression, such as a line or spot: a spill that left a mark on the rug; a mark next to each purchased item on the list.
2. A symbol, name, or other identifier, especially:
a. A name, logo, or other indicator used to indicate ownership, origin, or level of quality.
b. A notch made in an animal's ear or hide to indicate ownership.
c. A sign, such as a cross, made in lieu of a signature.
3. A written or printed symbol used for punctuation; a punctuation mark.
4.
a. A number, letter, or symbol used to indicate various grades of academic achievement: got a mark of 95 instead of 100.
b. often marks An appraisal; a rating: earned high marks from her superiors.
5. Nautical
a. A knot or piece of material placed at various measured lengths on a sounding line to indicate the depth of the water.
b. A Plimsoll mark.
6.
a. A distinctive trait or property: Good manners are the mark of a civilized person.
b. A recognized standard of quality: schoolwork that is not up to the mark.
c. A lasting effect: The experience had left its mark on all of us.
d. A specific model, type, or iteration, as of a product or machine, especially when part of a series. Usually used with a number: the mark IV model of this car.
7.
a. Importance; prominence: "a fellow of no mark nor likelihood" (Shakespeare).
b. Notice; attention: a matter unworthy of mark.
8. A target: "A mounted officer would be a conspicuous mark" (Ambrose Bierce).
9. Something that one wishes to achieve; a goal.
10. An object or point that serves as a guide.
11. Slang A person who is the intended victim of a swindler; a dupe.
12.
a. Sports The place from which racers begin and sometimes end their contest.
b. A point reached or gained: the halfway mark of the race.
c. A record: set a new mark in the long jump.
13. Sports
a. A strike or spare in bowling.
b. A stationary ball in lawn bowling; a jack.
14. A boundary between countries.
15. A tract of land in medieval England and Germany held in common by a community.
16. Computers A character or feature in a file, record, or data stream used to locate a specific point or condition.
v. marked, mark·ing, marks
v.tr.
1.
a. To make a visible trace or impression on, as with a spot, line, or dent: marked the wall with a crayon.
b. To form, make, or depict by making a mark: marked a square on the board.
c. To supply with natural markings: gray fur that is marked with stripes.
2.
a. To single out or indicate by or as if by a mark: marked the spot where the treasure was buried; a career marked for glory.
b. To distinguish or characterize: the exuberance that marks her writings; marked the occasion with celebrations.
c. To make conspicuous: a concert marking the composer's 60th birthday.
3. To set off or separate by or as if by a line or boundary: marked off the limits of our property.
4. To attach or affix identification, such as a price tag or maker's label, to.
5. To evaluate (academic work) according to a scale of letters or numbers; grade.
6.
a. To give attention to; notice: Mark her expression of discontent. Mark my words: they are asking for trouble.
b. To take note of in writing; write down: marked the appointment on my calendar.
c. Sports & Games To record (the score) in various games.
7. Sports To guard (an opponent), as in soccer.
v.intr.
1. To make a visible impression: This pen will mark under water.
2. To receive a visible impression: The floor marks easily.
3. Sports & Games To keep score.
4. To determine academic grades: a teacher who marks strictly.
Phrasal Verbs:
mark down
To mark for sale at a lower price.
mark up
1. To deface by covering with marks.
2. To mark for sale at a higher price.
Idioms:
beside the mark
Beside the point; irrelevant.
mark time
1. To move the feet alternately in the rhythm of a marching step without advancing.
2. To suspend progress for the time being; wait in readiness.
3. To function in an apathetic or ineffective manner.

[Middle English, from Old English mearc; see merg- in Indo-European roots.]

mark 2

 (märk)
n.
1. An English and Scottish unit of currency that was equal to 13 shillings and 4 pence.
2. Any of several European units of weight that were equal to about 8 ounces (227 grams), used especially for weighing gold and silver.
3. A deutsche mark.
4. A markka.

[Middle English, from Old English marc; see merg- in Indo-European roots. Sense 3, translation of German Mark, from Middle High German marc, marke, stamped precious metal bar, half-pound of silver or gold. Sense 4, translation of Finnish markka.]

Mark 1

 (märk)
n.
See Table at Bible.

Mark 2

 (märk)
n.
In Arthurian legend, a king of Cornwall who was the husband of Iseult and the uncle of her lover Tristan.

Mark

, Saint.
Author of the second Gospel in the New Testament and disciple of Saint Peter.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.Marks - English businessman who created a retail chain (1888-1964)
Translations
References in classic literature ?
The mousing man, who bore the name of Marks, instantly stopped his sipping, and, poking his head forward, looked shrewdly on the new acquaintance, as a cat sometimes looks at a moving dry leaf, or some other possible object of pursuit.
I have several such dried bits, which I use for marks in my whale-books.
Every human being carries with him from his cradle to his grave certain physical marks which do not change their character, and by which he can always be identified--and that without shade of doubt or question.
He had offered to the younger and more humble marks men divers birds of an inferior quality, and some shooting had already taken place, much to the pecuniary advantage of the sable owner of the game.
Since the objects of imitation are men in action, and these men must be either of a higher or a lower type (for moral character mainly answers to these divisions, goodness and badness being the distinguishing marks of moral differences), it follows that we must represent men either as better than in real life, or as worse, or as they are.
For a day or two the place looked so like an overflowed Arkansas town, because of its currentless waters laving the very doorsteps of all the houses, and the cluster of boats made fast under the windows, or skimming in and out of the alleys and by-ways, that I could not get rid of the impression that there was nothing the matter here but a spring freshet, and that the river would fall in a few weeks and leave a dirty high-water mark on the houses, and the streets full of mud and rubbish.
And as usual old `Uncle Mark Miller' brought me from the station with his ancient buggy and what he calls his `generous purpose' horse.
The contending archers took their station in turn, at the bottom of the southern access, the distance between that station and the mark allowing full distance for what was called a shot at rovers.
it is very well when you do but shoot at a shield, but when there is a man behind the shield, and he rides at you with wave of sword and glint of eyes from behind his vizor, you may find him a less easy mark.
Thinking it a mark of distinction, the Dog grew proud of his bell and went tinkling it all over the marketplace.
He has called up the North Banks Mark Boat, a few hundred miles west, and is reporting the case.
Every time I ascended to the deck from my watches below, I instantly gazed aft to mark if any strange face were visible; for my first vague disquietude touching the unknown captain, now in the seclusion of the sea, became almost a perturbation.